idol


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i·dol

 (īd′l)
n.
1.
a. An image used as an object of worship.
b. A false god.
2. One that is adored, often blindly or excessively.

[Middle English, from Old French idole, from Late Latin īdōlum, from Greek eidōlon, phantom, idol, from eidos, form; see weid- in Indo-European roots.]

idol

(ˈaɪdəl)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a material object, esp a carved image, that is worshipped as a god
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity Judaism any being (other than the one God) to which divine honour is paid
3. a person who is revered, admired, or highly loved
[C13: from Late Latin īdōlum, from Latin: image, from Greek eidōlon, from eidos shape, form]

i•dol

(ˈaɪd l)

n.
1. an image or other material object representing a deity and worshiped as such.
2. (in the Bible) a deity other than God.
3. a person or thing devotedly or excessively admired.
4. a mere image or semblance of something, visible but without substance.
5. a false notion; fallacy.
[1200–50; Middle English < Late Latin īdōlum < Greek eídōlon image, idol]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idol - a material effigy that is worshippedidol - a material effigy that is worshipped; "thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image"; "money was his god"
effigy, simulacrum, image - a representation of a person (especially in the form of sculpture); "the coin bears an effigy of Lincoln"; "the emperor's tomb had his image carved in stone"
golden calf - (Old Testament) an idol made by Aaron for the Israelites to worship; destroyed by Moses; it is now used to refer to anything worshipped undeservedly
joss - a Chinese god worshipped in the form of an idol
Juggernaut - a crude idol of Krishna
2.idol - someone who is adored blindly and excessivelyidol - someone who is adored blindly and excessively
heartthrob - an object of infatuation
principal, star, lead - an actor who plays a principal role
3.idol - an ideal instanceidol - an ideal instance; a perfect embodiment of a concept
ideal - the idea of something that is perfect; something that one hopes to attain
gold standard - a paragon of excellence; "academic education is the gold standard against which other educational activity is pejoratively judged"

idol

noun
1. hero, superstar, pin-up, favourite, pet, darling, beloved (slang), fave (informal) They cheered as they caught sight of their idol.
2. graven image, god, image, deity, pagan symbol They shaped the substance into idols that were eaten ceremoniously.
Translations
صَنَم، وَثَنمَعْبود
idolmodla
gudebilledeidol
epäjumalankuvaidoli
átrúnaîargoîskurîgoî, hjáguî
dievinimasgarbindamas kaip stabąstabmeldystėstabus garbinantis
elks
idol
idolmalik
çok sevilen kişigöz bebeğiput

idol

[ˈaɪdl] Nídolo m

idol

[ˈaɪdəl] n
(= statue) → idole f
(= hero) → idole f
a teen idol → une idole des jeunes
a fallen idol → une étoile déchue

idol

n (lit)Götze m, → Götzenbild nt; (fig)Idol nt, → Abgott m; (Film, TV etc) → Idol nt; a teen idolein Teenageridol nt; a fallen idolein gefallenes Idol

idol

[ˈaɪdl] nidolo

idol

(ˈaidl) noun
1. an image of a god, which is worshipped. The tribesmen bowed down before their idol.
2. a greatly loved person, thing etc. The singer was the idol of thousands of teenagers.
idolatry (aiˈdolətri) noun
1. the worship of idols.
2. too great admiration, especially of a person.
iˈdolatrous adjective
iˈdolatrously adverb
ˈidolize, ˈidolise verb
to love or admire a person etc greatly or too much. She idolized her older brother.
References in classic literature ?
AN Idol said to a Missionary, "My friend, why do you seek to bring me into contempt?
As the tongue was removed for the high priest's table, "Ah," said the Idol to himself, "that is the Sword of the Spirit - the only Sword that is less dangerous when unsheathed.
They had, I suppose, a great sacrifice that day; for there stood out, upon an old stump of a tree, a diabolical kind of idol made of wood; it was dressed up, too, in the most filthy manner; its upper garment was of sheepskins, with the wool outward; a great Tartar bonnet on the head, with two horns growing through it; it was about eight feet high, yet had no feet or legs, nor any other proportion of parts.
Not the wondrous cistern in the whale's huge head; not the prodigy of his unhinged lower jaw; not the miracle of his symmetrical tail; none of these would so surprise you, as half a glimpse of that unaccountable cone, -- longer than a Kentuckian is tall, nigh a foot in diameter at the base, and jet-black as Yojo, the ebony idol of Queequeg.
Badly smelleth their idol to me, the cold monster: badly they all smell to me, these idolaters.
To save you the trouble of wading through a lot of scientific detail, which I know you don't care about, I'll tell you that the story is about a queer idol of solid gold, weighing many pounds, and, in consequence, of great value.
Those who pleased to do so were allowed to repose implicit faith in an ill-favoured god with a large bottle-nose and fat shapeless arms crossed upon his breast; whilst others worshipped an image which, having no likeness either in heaven or on earth, could hardly be called an idol.
He was sitting on a bench before the fire, with his feet on the stove hearth, and in one hand was holding close up to his face that little negro idol of his; peering hard into its face, and with a jack-knife gently whittling away at its nose, meanwhile humming to himself in his heathenish way.
A VERY POOR MAN, a Carpenter by trade, had a wooden image of Mercury, before which he made offerings day by day, and begged the idol to make him rich, but in spite of his entreaties he became poorer and poorer.
Each of these medicine men has his idols carved in wood, representing the spirits of the air and of the fire, under some rude and grotesque form of a horse, a bear, a beaver, or other quadruped, or that of bird or fish.
He gave up worshipping idols, and although he did not at once become Christian, "he often sat alone with silent lips, while in his inmost heart he argued much with himself, considering what was best to do and what religion he should hold to.
Of these Bacon finds four sorts: idols of the tribe, which are inherent in human nature; idols of the cave, the errors of the individual; idols of the market-place, due to mistaken reliance on words; and idols of the theater