idyll

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i·dyll

also i·dyl  (īd′l)
n.
1.
a. A short poem or prose piece depicting a rural or pastoral scene, usually in idealized terms.
b. A narrative poem treating an epic or romantic theme.
2. A scene or event of a simple and tranquil nature.
3.
a. A carefree episode or experience: a summer idyll on the coast of France.
b. A romantic interlude.

[Latin īdyllium, from Greek eidullion, diminutive of eidos, form, figure; see weid- in Indo-European roots.]

idyll

(ˈɪdɪl) or

idyl

n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a poem or prose work describing an idealized rural life, pastoral scenes, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) any simple narrative or descriptive piece in poetry or prose
3. a charming or picturesque scene or event
4. (Classical Music) a piece of music with a calm or pastoral character
[C17: from Latin īdyllium, from Greek eidullion, from eidos shape, (literary) form]

i•dyll

or i•dyl

(ˈaɪd l)

n.
1. a poem or prose composition describing pastoral scenes or events or any charmingly simple episode or picturesque scene.
2. material suitable for such a work.
3. a long narrative poem on a major theme: Tennyson's Idylls of the King.
4. an episode or scene of idyllic charm.
5. a brief romantic affair.
[1595–1605; < Latin īdyllium < Greek eidýllion short pastoral poem]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idyll - an episode of such pastoral or romantic charm as to qualify as the subject of a poetic idyll
episode - a happening that is distinctive in a series of related events
2.idyll - a musical composition that evokes rural lifeidyll - a musical composition that evokes rural life
musical composition, opus, piece of music, composition, piece - a musical work that has been created; "the composition is written in four movements"
3.idyll - a short poem descriptive of rural or pastoral life
pastoral - a literary work idealizing the rural life (especially the life of shepherds)

idyll

noun heaven, ideal, paradise, Eden, Utopia, perfect place, Garden of Eden, Shangri-la, Happy Valley, seventh heaven, Erewhon This town was not the rural idyll she had imagined.
Translations
idylaselanka
idyl
idila

idyll

[ˈɪdɪl] Nidilio m

idyll

[ˈɪdəl] idyl (US) n
(= romance) → idylle f
Though they still talked a lot, Harry felt that their idyll was drawing to an end → Ils se parlaient toujours beaucoup mais Harry sentait bien que leur idylle touchait à sa fin.
(= idealized place) a rural idyll → une idylle bucolique

idyll

n
(Liter) → Idylle f
(fig)Idyll nt

idyll

[ˈɪdɪl] nidillio
References in classic literature ?
I think, scathed as you look, and charred and scorched, there must be a little sense of life in you yet, rising out of that adhesion at the faithful, honest roots: you will never have green leaves more-- never more see birds making nests and singing idyls in your boughs; the time of pleasure and love is over with you: but you are not desolate: each of you has a comrade to sympathise with him in his decay.
She had advanced far enough to join him in ridiculing the Idyls of the King, but not to feel the beauty of Ulysses and the Lotus Eaters.
The pairing of the birds is an idyl, not tedious as our idyls are; a tempest is a rough ode, without falsehood or rant; a summer, with its harvest sown, reaped, and stored, is an epic song, subordinating how many admirably executed parts.
But, as certain tenacities are stronger than others, Athos was forced to hear Planchet recite his idyls of felicity, translated into a language more chaste than that of Longus.
Browning's later work is, full of intellect, alive with excellent passages (in the first volume of the Dramatic Idyls [50] perhaps more powerful than in any earlier work); notwithstanding all that, we think the change here indicated matter of regret.
The editorial policy within this volume seems at times a bit uneven: Dooley on a few occasions makes suggestions for the interpretation of the poems, whereas the Ohio edition generally steers clear of this; and Ewbank includes a useful paragraph on the reception of Dramatic Idyls, while Dooley does not offer any information on the reception of the two collections that he edits.
Tennyson's later domestic idyls also reworked the female poetry of home life by situating domesticity within a frame that created complex perspectives and encouraging readers to associate his "idyls" with classical tradition rather than with predecessors like Hemans and Mary Russell Mitford.
Her first book, published in 1864, was a collection of war poems called Idyls of Battle and Poems of the Rebellion.