ignition point


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ignition point

n.
The minimum temperature at which a substance will continue to burn without additional application of external heat. Also called kindling point.
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Killed were a mother who fell to her death after lowering her two children to firefighters, and Ortiz's brother, whose body was found near the ignition point.
It generates enough radiant heat to rise other items in the room to their ignition point, " he said.
We are rapidly approaching an ignition point for converged services and networked products," said Kurt Scherf, vice president and principal analyst with Parks Associates.
and VANCOUVER, BC -- FatPort Corporation, an Ignition Point company, and Boingo Wireless announced today that FatPort's ultra-high-speed wireless hot spots have been integrated into the Boingo Wireless(TM) network.
We will study the scientific data on the ignition point of gasoline and the potential for wireless phones to create the spark that would be needed to ignite gasoline fumes.
Shaw said he also drove near where the riots began in 1992, but decided against taking his teammates to the ignition point at Florence and Normandie.
com) announced today an agreement with FatPort Corporation, an Ignition Point company, to integrate FatPort's broadband wireless "hotspots" with the iPass Global Broadband Roaming (GBR) service.
Our introduction of the External Search Machine is intended to serve as an ignition point for other industry leaders in the coprocessor space.
The lack of a method for controlling the ignition point, however, has prevented practical implementation of HCCI.
An unidentified 20-year-old man was questioned after he was discovered near the ignition point of the fire, on the northern edge of Franklin D.
FatPort is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ignition Point Technologies Corporation (TSX-VEN: IPN).
He said the ignition point of wood is normally 400 to 450 degrees but drops rapidly when wood is exposed to heat for a long period of time.