ikat

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i·kat

 (ē′kät)
n.
1. A craft in which one tie-dyes and weaves yarn to create an intricately designed fabric.
2. The fabric so created.

[Malay, tying, binding.]

ikat

(ˈaɪkæt)
n
(Dyeing) a method of creating patterns in fabric by tie-dyeing the yarn before weaving
[C20: from Malay, literally: to tie, bind]
References in periodicals archive ?
The sacredness and magical quality of the ikat technique was so well established in different cultures, that the Indian ikats carried by the traders became an integral part of the rites of passage in these places.
Casual beauty is the signature of Karastan's Intermezzo collection, which includes designs ranging from ikats, suzanis and ethnic tribals to exploded florals and Jacobean patterns.
Mary Neff completed her master bedroom with the red and white ikats and used the turquoise chevrons in her guest room.
Traditional ikats and textiles of the Dayak Benuaq and some indigenous bark cloths.
Fashion designers used a lot of these fabrics this year," such as ikats, Carley said.
Ideal for those design-oriented consumers who want a feel of nature indoors, hemp and jute collections were among the standouts at market, whether showcased alone with trendy patterns such as ikats and geometries or mixed with other fibers such as chenilles.
Hard-edged geometrics and shocking brights are softened this season through textural effects such as ikats, cross-dyed and space-dyed yarns," said Christine D'Ascoli, vice president of creative services at Covington Industries.
Strong designs such as ikats and ethnic looks and big, chunky textures also continued to gain ground.
The Spice Route, Olden Day China and the Forbidden City inspire flamboyant ikats, bright saris and colors such as exotic reds, imperial oranges and clay pinks.
This group follows the recent addition of Indian Sojourn, a soumak collection of ikats for the company's David Easton for Safavieh Couture, which will also be shown.
A group of "Nomad" prints include ikats inspired by the robes of Nomadic tribes of the Silk Road.