ill-kempt

Translations

ill-kempt

[ˈɪlˈkempt] ADJdesaliñado, desaseado
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References in classic literature ?
When last I saw him he was spruce enough, but he looked ill at ease: now, untidy and ill-kempt, he looked perfectly at home.
It was close upon four before the door opened, and a drunken-looking groom, ill-kempt and side-whiskered, with an inflamed face and disreputable clothes, walked into the room.
There was a mud plot where a ceremony was to take place, yet it looked ill-kempt, not at all sacred.
Scruffy Ill-kempt pooches in South West England were almost as offensive, while their scruffy cousins in Wales were judged to be the third worst groomed in the UK.
Yet, in his youth, Wingate seemed a rather dull fellow, untidy and ill-kempt.
It was dirty, ill-kempt and we couldn't summon help no matter how many times we rang for it.
Far too frequently, he settles nasty adjectives and blanket judgements upon the revolutionaries, calling the crowd "mob" and "beast of prey," participants "filthy," Marat a "foul, ill-kempt Swiss dwarf," and Robespierre an "imbecile fanatic.
When not going off to prison for the possession of a single joint of marijuana, they submit to the censorship of their careless and ill-kempt speech--twenty-three employees dismissed by the New York Times for passing salacious email; the city of San Diego forbidding the use of the word "minority"; public schools everywhere in the country proscribing books that children must not read.
I saw it a quarter-century ago when virtually overnight there emerged the dismal black-and-white generic label items, barebones shelving, cut-case displays, 21% interest rates, and ill-kempt stores that fostered a depression mentality among shoppers.
There, without the inconvenience of time- and money-wasting travel between the authentic if ill-kempt or otherwise inconvenient locales, affluent tourists - or "throughput" as they are known in corporate-speak - can, for example, view replicas of the White Cliffs of Dover in the early morning light, catch the Changing of the Guard at "Buck House" before noon, have lunch with Samuel Johnson at the Cheshire Cheese, take in the Battle of Britain during the afternoon, and recover from the London blitz before dinner.
Bridges brings his usual naturalistic restraint to Carter's initially terrified, then bemused free fall; Nolte is in agreeable antic form as another ill-kempt loser who's determined to clean a very dirty personal slate.
Sad to say, they too were an ill-kempt lot, another cookhouse detail described by journalist Peter Worthington as friendly and capable, but distinctly scruffy.