illegitimate

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Related to illegitimates: illegitimacy, Out-of-wedlock

il·le·git·i·mate

 (ĭl′ĭ-jĭt′ə-mĭt)
adj.
1.
a. Being against established or accepted rules and standards: an illegitimate means of winning a debate.
b. Being against the law; illegal: an illegitimate contract.
c. Not valid or defensible: Their reasons for missing school are illegitimate.
d. Incorrectly deduced; illogical: an illegitimate conclusion.
e. Biology Unacceptable as a scientific name because of not conforming to the international rules of nomenclature.
2. Offensive Born to parents not married to each other.

il′le·git′i·mate·ly adv.

illegitimate

(ˌɪlɪˈdʒɪtɪmɪt)
adj
1. born of parents who were not married to each other at the time of birth; bastard
2. forbidden by law; illegal; unlawful
3. (Logic) contrary to logic; incorrectly reasoned
n
an illegitimate person; bastard
ˌilleˈgitimacy, ˌilleˈgitimateness n
ˌilleˈgitimately adv

il•le•git•i•mate

(ˌɪl ɪˈdʒɪt ə mɪt)

adj.
1. born of parents who are not married to each other.
2. not sanctioned by usage or custom.
3. unlawful.
4. irregular; eccentric.
[1530–40]
il`le•git′i•mate•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.illegitimate - the illegitimate offspring of unmarried parentsillegitimate - the illegitimate offspring of unmarried parents
offspring, progeny, issue - the immediate descendants of a person; "she was the mother of many offspring"; "he died without issue"
Adj.1.illegitimate - contrary to or forbidden by lawillegitimate - contrary to or forbidden by law; "an illegitimate seizure of power"; "illicit trade"; "an outlaw strike"; "unlawful measures"
illegal - prohibited by law or by official or accepted rules; "an illegal chess move"
2.illegitimate - of marriages and offspring; not recognized as lawful
unauthorised, unauthorized - not endowed with authority
illegal - prohibited by law or by official or accepted rules; "an illegal chess move"
invalid - having no cogency or legal force; "invalid reasoning"; "an invalid driver's license"
legitimate - of marriages and offspring; recognized as lawful

illegitimate

adjective
1. born out of wedlock, natural, bastard, love, misbegotten (literary), baseborn (archaic) In 1985 the news of his illegitimate child came out.
3. invalid, incorrect, illogical, spurious, unsound It is not illegitimate to seek a parallel between the two events.
Quotations
"There are no illegitimate children - only illegitimate parents" [Judge Léon R. Yankwich]

illegitimate

adjective
1. Prohibited by law:
2. Of, involving, or being a crime:
3. Born to parents who are not married to each other:
Translations
غَيْر شَرْعيغَيْر مَسْموح قانونيّا
nemanželskýnezákonný
uægteulovliguretmæssig
aviotonlaitonväärä
házasságon kívül született
óréttmætur; ólögmæturóskilgetinn
ārlaulībā dzimisārlaulības-nelikumīgs
nezákonný
piçyasa dışı

illegitimate

[ˌɪlɪˈdʒɪtɪmɪt] ADJilegítimo

illegitimate

[ˌɪlɪˈdʒɪtɪmət] adj
[child] → illégitime
(= unlawful) → illégitimeill-equipped [ˌɪliˈkwɪpt] adj [person] → mal armé(e)
to be ill-equipped for sth → être mal armé(e) pour qch
to be ill-equipped to do sth [person, organization] → être mal armé(e) pour faire qch
Universities were ill-equipped to meet the massive intake of students → Les universités étaient mal armées pour faire face à l'arrivée massive d'étudiants.ill-fated [ˌɪlˈfeɪtɪd] adj [expedition] → de triste mémoire, funeste; [attempt] → de triste mémoire, funeste; [organization, place] → de triste mémoire; [romance] → de triste mémoireill-favoured [ˌɪlˈfeɪvərd] (British) ill-favored (US) adjdéplaisant(e)ill feeling nressentiment m, rancune fill-fitting [ˌɪlˈfɪtɪŋ] adj
ill-fitting shoes → des chaussures qui ne vont pas bien
He wore an ill-fitting green corduroy suit → Il portait un costume en velours vert qui lui allait mal.ill-founded [ˌɪlˈfaʊndɪd] adj [belief, argument] → sans fondement; [rumour] → sans fondementill-gotten gains nplbiens mpl mal acquisill health nmauvaise santé f
He was forced to retire because of ill health
BUT Il a été forcé de démissionner pour raisons de santé.Il a été forcé de démissionner pour cause de mauvaise santé.ill-humoured [ˌɪlˈhjuːmərd] (British) ill-humored (US) adjde mauvaise humeur

illegitimate

adj
child, birthunehelich
(= contrary to law)unzulässig, unerlaubt; governmentunrechtmäßig; the illegitimate use of drugs(der) Drogenmissbrauch
argument, conclusion, inferenceunzulässig, nicht folgerichtig, illegitim

illegitimate

[ˌɪlɪˈdʒɪtɪmɪt] adjillegittimo/a

illegitimate

(iliˈdʒitəmət) adjective
1. born of parents not married to each other.
2. unacceptable or not allowed (especially by law).
ˌilleˈgitimately adverb
ˌilleˈgitimacy noun
References in periodicals archive ?
234) Milanich's masterful study provides the context for understanding the 1998 law as a victory for Chilean illegitimates.
Illegitimates had no civil status and were thus denied kin-based benefits, such as social security, worker's indemnity, and inheritance.
Children from working, middle, and upper class families would be placed in their respective class positions based on filial ties; illegitimate children would consequently find themselves as part of a kinless underclass.
While both laws disinherited illegitimate children, they acknowledged paternity differently.
Some of the most celebrated figures of this period were born out of wedlock and into poverty, including Henry Stanley and Catherine Cookson, but several less famous illegitimates have also left thoughtful memoirs.
I have also surveyed a number of legitimate working-class autobiographers, and these works offer strong basis for comparison to the experiences of illegitimates.
Some of the children, of course, ended up in state care; particularly after the New Poor Law, the number of illegitimates eligible for outdoor relief fell steadily.
On the one hand, some private charities and state welfare agencies specifically excluded illegitimates, so their problems remained unaddressed.
They disclose an enormous range of outcomes for illegitimates, depending on class, gender, and location, but also deriving from "certain fundamental ambiguities of law" (250).
Illegitimates could be a family blemish but also a family resource.
Regarding fathers' treatment of them he comments, "Here, as in so much else revolving around illegitimates, there was no single script to follow" (150).
Not only this, she pretends to know that this one in five are all illegitimates, conceived by mothers who only did so in order to get Social Security benefits.