illocution

(redirected from Illocutionary)

illocution

(ˌɪləˈkjuːʃən)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy an act performed by a speaker by virtue of uttering certain words, as for example the acts of promising or of threatening. Also called: illocutionary act See also performative Compare perlocution
[C20: from il- + locution]
ˌilloˈcutionary adj
Translations
Illokution
illocution
발화
illocutie
References in periodicals archive ?
She classifies verbs into five self- contained categories: neutral, structuring, illocutionary, discourse signalling and descriptive verbs.
It should be stated though that the illocutionary force of a warning of this nature is sometimes implied, as such its interpretation would require contextual information.
Having turned to speech-act theory, while noting the effect of illocutionary force therein, Miller opened a theoretical vantage point for studying, together, genre and culture.
Conferring a certain illocutionary force to the word, "all" begins to frame a recurrent motive: the continual rehearsal of poetry's evocative potential, materialized here precisely as the persistent exploration of the distinct and changing multiplicities that the word "all" can summon in each poem and in each utterance.
While, on one level, speaking or writing is already an action (a locutionary act), on another level, we also perform actions in saying something (an illocutionary act) or by--or in consequence of--saying something (a perlocutionary act).
The radical and hereto underestimated power of the Protestation was its illocutionary force.
For in, as in saying something we may be doing something, Austin says it produces an illocutionary act.
Imperatives that uses amar fi'il structure and fi'il nahyi have meaning and illocutionary locutions.
The descriptive content isn't racist, but the illocutionary force -- the meaning of saying it -- may well be.
Philosophers and researchers of speech communication classify speech act verbs into three: 1) locutionary verbs performing the act of saying something, 2) illocutionary verbs which perform an act in saying something and, 3) perlocutionary verbs which perform an act by saying something (Leech, p.
The author has organized the main body of her text in ten chapters covering the delimitation of involvement as a linguistic category, political interviews as a discourse genre, illocutionary force and speech act theory, and a variety of other related subjects.