illuminative


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il·lu·mi·na·tive

 (ĭ-lo͞o′mə-nā′tĭv)
adj.
Of, causing, or capable of causing illumination.
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illuminative

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References in periodicals archive ?
Tradition has divided the spiritual life into three states, known as the purgative, illuminative and unitive ways, or the ways of beginners, proficients and the perfect.
s unique insights and illuminative of his personality.
These prismatic knobs from Top Knobs offer illuminative qualities that reflect and highlight the colors in a room, an element desirable to any designer.
APPLYING SOREN KIERKEGAARD'S "aesthetic," "ethical," and "religious" categories to the interpretation of literature can be revealing; in some cases they are truly illuminative.
Why are practices such as fasting, celibacy, and simple living held by many traditions to be helpful, and in some cases necessary, to the attainment of illuminative experience?
Illuminative took his time to reach top gear, but when doing so John Gosden's gelding outclassed his rivals in the 1m1f maiden.
The cargo cult explanation does not entirely explain the power of these signs, by which my witnessing the grief of the two men, and their stories, illuminated in me further productive and illuminative energies.
John of the Cross, the 16th-century Carmelite reformer and Doctor of the Church, blended mystical poetry, which he called "expressions of love arising from abundant mystical understanding," (47) with discursive commentary to unfold somewhat systematically the classical purgative, illuminative, and unitive stages that culminate in the "highest degree of perfection one can reach in this life (transformation in God).
For a very illuminative discussion of teleology in Aquinas, see Daniel McInerny, The Difficult Good.
The remaining three weeks focus intensely on the life of Christ, the Passion, Resurrection and Ascension, and move from desolation to consolation, from the purgative to the illuminative way (Loyola 2, 23).
Classically, spiritual growth has been described in three stages: purgative, illuminative, and unitive.
This shows that dialogue between scholars of different religious affiliations and different disciplines can be very illuminative and fruitful and can lead to a good understanding among the parties involved.