illuminism


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Related to illuminism: illuminati, illuminist

il·lu·mi·nism

 (ĭ-lo͞o′mə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. Belief in or proclamation of a special personal enlightenment.
2. Illuminism The ideas and principles of various groups of Illuminati.

[French illuminisme, from illuminé, an illuminist, from past participle of illuminer, to illuminate, from Old French; see illumine.]

il·lu′mi·nist n.

illuminism

(ɪˈluːmɪˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) belief in and advocation of special enlightenment
2. (Philosophy) the tenets and principles of the Illuminati or of any of several religious or political movements initiated by them
ilˈluminist n

il•lu•mi•nism

(ɪˈlu məˌnɪz əm)

n.
the doctrines or claims of Illuminati.
[1790–1800]
il•lu′mi•nist, n.

Illuminism

1. (l.c.) the claim to possess superior knowledge.
2. the beliefs or claims of certain religious groups or sects that they possess special religious enlightenment. — Illuminati, illuminati, Illuminist, illuminist, n.
See also: Knowledge
References in classic literature ?
The majority of the Brothers, seeing in it dangerous designs of Illuminism,* met it with a coldness that surprised Pierre.
Venegas had earlier testified in inquisitorial proceedings against the priest Luis Beteta, accused of Illuminism (1538).
First, although Plato had abstracted from concrete reality and had linked knowledge to separate mental entities, ideas, there had existed in the Platonic tradition an acute epoptic hope, fed by a kind of revelation and illuminism, of coming at some end of a metaphysical ladder to a cognition in the form of an ineluctable visual presence of God.
Novikov' (A Rosicrucian utopia: Freemasonry, Rosicrucianism, and Illuminism in 18th-century Russia: q]ae circle of N.
Teresa thus lived under the shadow of Illuminism and the ecclesiastical misogyny with which it was inextricably associated.
41) Marcia Keith Suchard, "Leibniz, Benzelius, and the Kabbalistic Roots of Swedish Illuminism," in Leibniz, Mysticism.
Illuminism would add a pragmatic and utilitarian content to various depictions of the 19th century landscape, produced and disseminated within the intermediary zone between art and science, between meaning and an outlet for disinterested aesthetic sensibility.