illusory

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Related to illusorily: illusionary

il·lu·so·ry

 (ĭ-lo͞o′sə-rē, -zə-rē)
adj.
Produced by, based on, or having the nature of an illusion; deceptive: an illusory belief that their finances would improve.

illusory

(ɪˈluːsərɪ) or

illusive

adj
producing, produced by, or based on illusion; deceptive or unreal
ilˈlusorily, ilˈlusively adv
ilˈlusoriness, ilˈlusiveness n
Usage: Illusive is sometimes wrongly used where elusive is meant: they fought hard, but victory remained elusive (not illusive)

il•lu•so•ry

(ɪˈlu sə ri, -zə-)

adj.
1. causing illusion; deceptive; misleading.
2. like an illusion; unreal.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin illūsōrius=illūd(ere) to mock, ridicule (see illusion) + -tōrius -tory1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.illusory - based on or having the nature of an illusion; "illusive hopes of finding a better job"; "Secret activities offer presidents the alluring but often illusory promise that they can achieve foreign policy goals without the bothersome debate and open decision that are staples of democracy"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"

illusory

illusive

illusory

adjective
1. Of, relating to, or in the nature of an illusion; lacking reality:
2. Tending to lead one into error:
3. Tending to deceive; of the nature of an illusion:
Translations
illusorius
iluzoriu

illusory

[ɪˈluːsəri] adjillusoire

illusory

a. ilusorio-a, rel. a la ilusión.
References in periodicals archive ?
The "primary identification" with the camera is here (more or less) detached from the syntactical operations of suture that place us illusorily within what Stephen Heath has called "narrative space.
The book is at risk of dissolving its history of moments of encounter and its poignant handling of the crucial moment of the voice into the timeless, illusorily shared present of a Great Conversation.
They found that slow brain waves called theta oscillations, which are involved in encoding boundaries of sounds, were suppressed during an interruption in a sound when that sound was illusorily restored.