illusory

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Related to illusoriness: illusional, illusorily

il·lu·so·ry

 (ĭ-lo͞o′sə-rē, -zə-rē)
adj.
Produced by, based on, or having the nature of an illusion; deceptive: an illusory belief that their finances would improve.

illusory

(ɪˈluːsərɪ) or

illusive

adj
producing, produced by, or based on illusion; deceptive or unreal
ilˈlusorily, ilˈlusively adv
ilˈlusoriness, ilˈlusiveness n
Usage: Illusive is sometimes wrongly used where elusive is meant: they fought hard, but victory remained elusive (not illusive)

il•lu•so•ry

(ɪˈlu sə ri, -zə-)

adj.
1. causing illusion; deceptive; misleading.
2. like an illusion; unreal.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin illūsōrius=illūd(ere) to mock, ridicule (see illusion) + -tōrius -tory1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.illusory - based on or having the nature of an illusion; "illusive hopes of finding a better job"; "Secret activities offer presidents the alluring but often illusory promise that they can achieve foreign policy goals without the bothersome debate and open decision that are staples of democracy"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"

illusory

illusive

illusory

adjective
1. Of, relating to, or in the nature of an illusion; lacking reality:
2. Tending to lead one into error:
3. Tending to deceive; of the nature of an illusion:
Translations
illusorius
iluzoriu

illusory

[ɪˈluːsəri] adjillusoire

illusory

a. ilusorio-a, rel. a la ilusión.
References in classic literature ?
The secret of the illusoriness is in the necessity of a succession of moods or objects.
The second chapter, probably the meatiest and most exciting for scholars of the novel, reads in tandem Defoe's Robinson Crusoe and Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature to demonstrate how both authors manipulate spiritual autobiography to create wonder in the everyday and, specifically, to reveal life's contingency; the "epistemological indeterminacy" that their narrators face leads to "a provisional belief in which one assents while recognizing the illusoriness of that to which one assents," which in turn "creates a paradigm for the assent that fiction itself solicits" (77).
Seen from the proper angle, this piece invites one to plunge into the illusoriness of what Flynt takes to be the Necker cube's "logically impossible space," an effect no less transcendent than that of any James Turrell.
Christopher Lee considers that structure of unfulfilled desire in terms of lateness, a condition that, being intrinsic to the field, prevents the latter's full emergence: "In a reversal of the logic of 'being on time' whereby an academic discipline 'catches up' to its object of study, what becomes clear here is the illusoriness of the very desire, on the part of Asian Canadian Studies, to finally coincide with its own object" (2007, 4).
It is worth noting how in the third chapter Kapuscinski skillfully manifests the topos of an ancient ruler, referring to Procopius's apocryphal account on Justinian and his courtiers (with a ghostly motif of a head which disappears only to reappear on the ruler's neck--perhaps a symbol of illusoriness or of temporary authority of a particular ruler).
The illusoriness of the problem of violation of the causality principle in SR and, hence, that of prohibition of motion with superluminal velocity have been found.
In this way, he acknowledges the illusoriness of his translations' translucency.
Borges's evocation of Schopenhauer's thought, with its belief in the illusoriness of all individuals, is particular problematic in the context of "Deutsches Requiem" because we are dealing with a clear historical event (denunciation of the Nazi horror).
As a coda to the book, he draws on contemporary interpretations of quantum theory and Buddhist logics of illusoriness to propose a move beyond materialist, closed frameworks, towards openness to possibility and a weaning away from the search for a reified "world.
For both the Spanish and the English poet there could not but be an essential illusoriness in reality" (Abel 78).
Brecht explains how "deception and errors" are self-evident: when correct sentences are placed alongside incorrect ones, ruptures appear in the context of the incorrect sentences and thus expose the illusoriness of their correctness (Schriften 2 89-90).