illustrated


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il·lus·trate

 (ĭl′ə-strāt′, ĭ-lŭs′trāt′)
v. il·lus·trat·ed, il·lus·trat·ing, il·lus·trates
v.tr.
1.
a. To clarify or explain, as by the use of examples or comparisons: The mayor illustrated the problem with an anecdote.
b. To serve as an example or clarification of: a story that illustrates a broader social problem.
2. To provide (a text) with explanatory or decorative images: illustrated the book with colorful drawings.
3. Obsolete To light up; illuminate.
v.intr.
To present a clarification, example, or explanation.

[Latin illūstrāre, illūstrāt- : in-, in; see in-2 + lūstrāre, to make bright; see leuk- in Indo-European roots.]

il′lus·trat′a·ble adj.
il′lus·tra′tor n.

illustrated

(ˈɪləstreɪtɪd)
adj
1. (Journalism & Publishing) (of a book, text, etc) decorated with or making use of pictures
2. (Art Terms) (of a book, text, etc) decorated with or making use of pictures
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

illustrated

adjective pictured, decorated, illuminated, embellished, pictorial, with illustrations The book is beautifully illustrated throughout.
Translations
مُوَضَّح بالصُّوَر
ilustrovaný
illustreret
myndskreyttur
ilustrovaný
resimli

illustrated

[ˈɪləstreɪtɪd]
A. ADJ [book, catalogue] → ilustrado
B. CPD illustrated (news)paper N (Hist) → revista f gráfica

illustrated

[ˈɪləstreɪtɪd] adj [book] → illustré(e)
The book is beautifully illustrated throughout → Le livre est magnifiquement illustré de bout en bout.
a beautifully illustrated book → un livre aux belles illustrations, un livre magnifiquement illustré
lavishly illustrated → richement illustré(e)

illustrate

(ˈiləstreit) verb
1. to provide (a book, lecture etc) with pictures, diagrams etc.
2. to make (a statement etc) clearer by providing examples etc. Let me illustrate my point; This diagram will illustrate what I mean.
ˈillustrated adjective
having pictures etc. an illustrated catalogue.
ˌilluˈstration noun
1. a picture. coloured illustrations.
2. an example.
3. the act of illustrating.
ˈillustrative (-strətiv) , ((American) iˈlastrətiv) adjective
ˈillustrator noun
a person who draws pictures etc for books etc.
References in classic literature ?
And Meg illustrated by putting on the bonnet and regarding him with an air of calm satisfaction that was irresistible.
Cuzak had brought home with him a roll of illustrated Bohemian papers.
He then leaned one elbow upon the piano, and, crossing one foot over the other, remained standing in an attitude he remembered to have seen in the pages of an illustrated paper as portraying the hero in some drawing-room scene.
It was a cookery book, full of innumerable old fashions of English dishes, and illustrated with engravings, which represented the arrangements of the table at such banquets as it might have befitted a nobleman to give in the great hall of his castle.
Had they followed their hereditary taste, the New England settlers would have illustrated all events of public importance by bonfires, banquets, pageantries, and processions.
He looked round the barroom with rather an anxious air, and, retreating with his valuables to the warmest corner, disposed them under his chair, sat down, and looked rather apprehensively up at the worthy whose heels illustrated the end of the mantel-piece, who was spitting from right to left, with a courage and energy rather alarming to gentlemen of weak nerves and particular habits.
The minister related many a touching incident in the lives of the departed, too, which illustrated their sweet, generous natures, and the people could easily see, now, how noble and beautiful those episodes were, and remembered with grief that at the time they occurred they had seemed rank rascalities, well deserving of the cowhide.
Soon after my arrival, I was told of a circumstance which illustrated their spirit.
The divining party again laid their heads together: apparently they could not agree about the word or syllable the scene illustrated.
On the table near at hand were some flowers and a number of an illustrated paper.
e of our forefathers; indeed, I am convinced, that however I myself may fail in the ensuing attempt, yet, with more labour in collecting, or more skill in using, the materials within his reach, illustrated as they have been by the labours of Dr Henry, of the late Mr Strutt, and, above all, of Mr Sharon Turner, an abler hand would have been successful; and therefore I protest, beforehand, against any argument which may be founded on the failure of the present experiment.
So the lad was looking rather sulky, as with listless fingers he turned over the pages of an elaborately illustrated edition of Manon Lescaut that he had found in one of the book-cases.