illustrious


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il·lus·tri·ous

 (ĭ-lŭs′trē-əs)
adj.
1. Well known and very distinguished; eminent. See Synonyms at famous.
2. Obsolete Shining brightly.

[From Latin illūstris, from illūstrāre, to give glory to, shine upon; see illustrate.]

il·lus′tri·ous·ly adv.
il·lus′tri·ous·ness n.

illustrious

(ɪˈlʌstrɪəs)
adj
1. of great renown; famous and distinguished
2. glorious or great: illustrious deeds.
3. obsolete shining
[C16: from Latin illustris bright, distinguished, famous, from illustrāre to make light; see illustrate]
ilˈlustriously adv
ilˈlustriousness n

il•lus•tri•ous

(ɪˈlʌs tri əs)

adj.
1. highly distinguished; renowned.
2. Archaic. luminous; bright.
[1560–70; < Latin illustri(s) bright, clear, famous]
il•lus′tri•ous•ly, adv.
il•lus′tri•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.illustrious - widely known and esteemed; "a famous actor"; "a celebrated musician"; "a famed scientist"; "an illustrious judge"; "a notable historian"; "a renowned painter"
known - apprehended with certainty; "a known quantity"; "the limits of the known world"; "a musician known throughout the world"; "a known criminal"
2.illustrious - having or conferring glory; "an illustrious achievement"
glorious - having or deserving or conferring glory; "a long and glorious career"; "our glorious literature"

illustrious

illustrious

adjective
Translations
مَشْهور، شَهير
vynikající
berømt
jeles
frægur; markverîur
izcilsslavens

illustrious

[ɪˈlʌstrɪəs] ADJilustre

illustrious

[ɪˈlʌstriəs] adjillustre
my illustrious predecessor → mon illustre prédécesseurill will ill-will [ˌɪlˈwɪl] nrancune f
to feel ill will towards sb → nourrir une rancune contre qn
He assured me he felt no ill will toward me → Il m'a assuré qu'il ne nourrissait aucune rancune contre moi.ill wind n
it's an ill wind ..., it's an ill wind that blows nobody any good → à quelque chose malheur est bon

illustrious

adjglanzvoll; personberühmt; deeds, pastglorreich

illustrious

[ɪˈlʌstrɪəs] adjillustre

illustrious

(iˈlastriəs) adjective
of a very high quality, ability etc; famous. an illustrious career; He is the most illustrious of a famous family.
ilˈlustriousness noun
References in classic literature ?
Pages might yet be written to prove, from this illustrious example, the defects of human excellence; to show how easy it is for generous sentiments, high courtesy, and chivalrous courage to lose their influence beneath the chilling blight of selfishness, and to exhibit to the world a man who was great in all the minor attributes of character, but who was found wanting when it became necessary to prove how much principle is superior to policy.
By degrees, the observer came to feel nearly as much interest in this chicken of illustrious race as the mother-hen did.
Had there been a Papist among the crowd of Puritans, he might have seen in this beautiful woman, so picturesque in her attire and mien, and with the infant at her bosom, an object to remind him of the image of Divine Maternity, which so many illustrious painters have vied with one another to represent; something which should remind him, indeed, but only by contrast, of that sacred image of sinless motherhood, whose infant was to redeem the world.
The page said, further, that dinner was about ended in the great hall by this time, and that as soon as the sociability and the heavy drinking should begin, Sir Kay would have me in and exhibit me before King Arthur and his illustrious knights seated at the Table Round, and would brag about his exploit in capturing me, and would probably exaggerate the facts a little, but it wouldn't be good form for me to correct him, and not over safe, either; and when I was done being exhibited, then ho for the dungeon; but he, Clarence, would find a way to come and see me every now and then, and cheer me up, and help me get word to my friends.
Took me, too; took the colonels, the captains, the women, the children, and the dumb brutes; took Buffalo Bill, and all his scouts; took the garrison - to the last man; and in forty-eight hours the Indian encampment was hers, illustrious old Thunder-Bird and all.
The emperor said it was--but charitably advised him to go and hunt hares and not endanger so precious a life as his in an attempt which had brought death to so many of the world's most illustrious heroes.
This time the Thursday boat had not arrived at ten at night-- so the people had waited at the landing all day for nothing; they were driven to their homes by a heavy storm without having had a view of the illustrious foreigners.
No, he would be a soldier, and return after long years, all war-worn and illustrious.
You will remind me of the experiment of that illustrious philosopher who measured the velocity of a great storm by a flight of small feathers.
Really, for a man who had been out of practice for so many years, it was a splendid laugh, a most illustrious laugh.
This was bad enough; but, as the philosophic Dane observes, with that universal applicability which distinguishes the illustrious ornament of the Elizabethan Era, worse remains behind
Here matter new to gaze the Devil met Undazl'd, farr and wide his eye commands, For sight no obstacle found here, nor shade, But all Sun-shine, as when his Beams at Noon Culminate from th' AEQUATOR, as they now Shot upward still direct, whence no way round Shadow from body opaque can fall, and the Aire, No where so cleer, sharp'nd his visual ray To objects distant farr, whereby he soon Saw within kenn a glorious Angel stand, The same whom JOHN saw also in the Sun: His back was turnd, but not his brightness hid; Of beaming sunnie Raies, a golden tiar Circl'd his Head, nor less his Locks behind Illustrious on his Shoulders fledge with wings Lay waving round; on som great charge imploy'd Hee seemd, or fixt in cogitation deep.