imaginings


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imaginings

(ɪˈmædʒɪnɪŋz)
pl n
literary things that a person imagines may take place or may have taken place
Translations

imaginings

[ɪˈmædʒɪnɪŋz] NPL (liter) → imaginaciones fpl, figuraciones fpl

imaginings

[ɪˈmædʒɪnɪŋs] n (liter) → fantasie fpl
References in classic literature ?
The friend who knew most of Eva's own imaginings and foreshadowings was her faithful bearer, Tom.
A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses encloses its own secret; that every room in every one of them encloses its own secret; that every beating heart in the hundreds of thousands of breasts there, is, in some of its imaginings, a secret to the heart nearest it
The man was greeted with shouts of welcome from his fellows, to whom he imparted all that he knew and guessed of the actions of their master, so that the entire safari was aware of matters before Baynes, who marched close to the head of the column, was reached and acquainted with the facts and the imaginings of the black boy whom Malbihn had deserted in the clearing the night before.
I start at my own shadow, and am full of all sorts of horrible imaginings.
I was now so nervous with my own imaginings that I immediately drew my revolver.
It will itself be ashamed of its imaginings, but yet it will recall it all, it will go over and over every detail, it will invent unheard of things against itself, pretending that those things might happen, and will forgive nothing.
As for the rest of your enemies and ill-wishers, I am certain that it is with vain imaginings that you are vexing yourself.
Silence followed: and I leaned back drowsily in my easy-chair, filled with bright and beautiful imaginings of Arthur and his lady-love, and of all the peace and happiness in store for them.
In the evening I put on my waterproof and I walked far upon the sodden moor, full of dark imaginings, the rain beating upon my face and the wind whistling about my ears.
Apparently the age of romance was not dead, and there was common ground upon which the wildest imaginings of the novelist could meet the actual scientific investigations of the searcher for truth.
He was surprised to find this young woman--who though but a milkmaid had just that touch of rarity about her which might make her the envied of her housemates--shaping such sad imaginings.
On the other hand, these morbid imaginings (as I was far from unwilling to consider them) had one and all deserted me in the sane, clean company of the capital young fellow in the next room.