imbibe

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im·bibe

 (ĭm-bīb′)
v. im·bibed, im·bib·ing, im·bibes
v.tr.
1. To drink.
2. To absorb or take in as if by drinking: "The whole body ... imbibes delight through every pore" (Henry David Thoreau).
3. To receive and absorb into the mind: "Gladstone had ... imbibed a strong prejudice against Americans" (Philip Magnus).
4. Obsolete To permeate; saturate.
v.intr.
To drink alcoholic beverages.

[Middle English embiben, to soak up, saturate, from Latin imbibere, to drink in, imbibe : in-, in; see in-2 + bibere, to drink; see pō(i)- in Indo-European roots.]

im·bib′er n.

imbibe

(ɪmˈbaɪb)
vb
1. to drink (esp alcoholic drinks)
2. literary to take in or assimilate (ideas, facts, etc): to imbibe the spirit of the Renaissance.
3. (tr) to take in as if by drinking: to imbibe fresh air.
4. to absorb or cause to absorb liquid or moisture; assimilate or saturate
[C14: from Latin imbibere, from bibere to drink]
imˈbiber n

im•bibe

(ɪmˈbaɪb)

v. -bibed, -bib•ing. v.t.
1. to consume (liquids) by drinking; drink.
2. to absorb or soak up: Plants imbibe light from the sun.
3. to receive into the mind: to imbibe a sermon.
v.i.
4. to drink, esp. alcoholic beverages.
5. to absorb liquid or moisture.
[1350–1400; Middle English enbiben < Middle French embiber < Latin imbibere to drink in =im- im-1 + bibere to drink]
im•bib′er, n.
syn: See drink.

imbibe


Past participle: imbibed
Gerund: imbibing

Imperative
imbibe
imbibe
Present
I imbibe
you imbibe
he/she/it imbibes
we imbibe
you imbibe
they imbibe
Preterite
I imbibed
you imbibed
he/she/it imbibed
we imbibed
you imbibed
they imbibed
Present Continuous
I am imbibing
you are imbibing
he/she/it is imbibing
we are imbibing
you are imbibing
they are imbibing
Present Perfect
I have imbibed
you have imbibed
he/she/it has imbibed
we have imbibed
you have imbibed
they have imbibed
Past Continuous
I was imbibing
you were imbibing
he/she/it was imbibing
we were imbibing
you were imbibing
they were imbibing
Past Perfect
I had imbibed
you had imbibed
he/she/it had imbibed
we had imbibed
you had imbibed
they had imbibed
Future
I will imbibe
you will imbibe
he/she/it will imbibe
we will imbibe
you will imbibe
they will imbibe
Future Perfect
I will have imbibed
you will have imbibed
he/she/it will have imbibed
we will have imbibed
you will have imbibed
they will have imbibed
Future Continuous
I will be imbibing
you will be imbibing
he/she/it will be imbibing
we will be imbibing
you will be imbibing
they will be imbibing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been imbibing
you have been imbibing
he/she/it has been imbibing
we have been imbibing
you have been imbibing
they have been imbibing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been imbibing
you will have been imbibing
he/she/it will have been imbibing
we will have been imbibing
you will have been imbibing
they will have been imbibing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been imbibing
you had been imbibing
he/she/it had been imbibing
we had been imbibing
you had been imbibing
they had been imbibing
Conditional
I would imbibe
you would imbibe
he/she/it would imbibe
we would imbibe
you would imbibe
they would imbibe
Past Conditional
I would have imbibed
you would have imbibed
he/she/it would have imbibed
we would have imbibed
you would have imbibed
they would have imbibed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.imbibe - take in, also metaphoricallyimbibe - take in, also metaphorically; "The sponge absorbs water well"; "She drew strength from the minister's words"
mop, mop up, wipe up - to wash or wipe with or as if with a mop; "Mop the hallway now"; "He mopped her forehead with a towel"
blot - dry (ink) with blotting paper
sponge up - absorb as if with a sponge; "sponge up the spilled milk on the counter"
2.imbibe - take (gas, light or heat) into a solutionimbibe - take (gas, light or heat) into a solution
absorb - become imbued; "The liquids, light, and gases absorb"
3.imbibe - take in liquids; "The patient must drink several liters each day"; "The children like to drink soda"
ingest, consume, have, take in, take - serve oneself to, or consume regularly; "Have another bowl of chicken soup!"; "I don't take sugar in my coffee"
swill down, swill - drink large quantities of (liquid, especially alcoholic drink)
suck - draw into the mouth by creating a practical vacuum in the mouth; "suck the poison from the place where the snake bit"; "suck on a straw"; "the baby sucked on the mother's breast"
guggle, gurgle - drink from a flask with a gurgling sound
sip - drink in sips; "She was sipping her tea"
guzzle - drink greedily or as if with great thirst; "The boys guzzled the cheap vodka"
lap up, lick, lap - take up with the tongue; "The cat lapped up the milk"; "the cub licked the milk from its mother's breast"
drain the cup, drink up - drink to the last drop; "drink up--there's more wine coming"
gulp, quaff, swig - to swallow hurriedly or greedily or in one draught; "The men gulped down their beers"
belt down, bolt down, down, drink down, pour down, toss off, pop, kill - drink down entirely; "He downed three martinis before dinner"; "She killed a bottle of brandy that night"; "They popped a few beer after work"
4.imbibe - receive into the mind and retain; "Imbibe ethical principles"
assimilate, ingest, absorb, take in - take up mentally; "he absorbed the knowledge or beliefs of his tribe"

imbibe

verb (Formal)
1. drink, consume, knock back (informal), neck (slang), sink (informal), swallow, suck, hoover (informal), swig (informal), quaff They were used to imbibing enormous quantities of alcohol.
2. absorb, receive, take in, gain, gather, acquire, assimilate, ingest He'd imbibed a set of mystical beliefs from the cradle.

imbibe

verb
1. To take into the mouth and swallow (a liquid):
Informal: swig, toss down (or off).
Slang: belt.
2. To take alcoholic liquor, especially excessively or habitually:
Informal: nip, soak.
Slang: booze, lush, tank up.
Idioms: bend the elbow, hit the bottle .
3. To take in (moisture or liquid):
4. To take in and incorporate, especially mentally:
Informal: soak (up).
Translations
juoda

imbibe

[ɪmˈbaɪb]
A. VT (frm) (= drink) → beber (fig) [+ atmosphere] → empaparse de; [+ information] → imbuirse de (frm), empaparse de
B. VI (o.f., also hum) → beber

imbibe

vt
(form, hum)trinken, bechern (hum)
(fig) ideas, informationin sich (acc)aufnehmen
vi (hum: = drink) → viel trinken

imbibe

[ɪmˈbaɪb] vt (frm) (also) (hum) (drink) → bere (fig) (absorb) → assorbire, assimilare
References in classic literature ?
The great novelist vibrated between two decanters with the regularity of a pendulum; the famous divine flirted openly with one of the Madame de Staels of the age, who looked daggers at another Corinne, who was amiably satirizing her, after outmaneuvering her in efforts to absorb the profound philosopher, who imbibed tea Johnsonianly and appeared to slumber, the loquacity of the lady rendering speech impossible.
It seemed, in truth, to be a spot devoted to seclusion, and the sisters imbibed a soothing impression of security, as they gazed upon its romantic though not unappalling beauties.
She grew to have a dread of children; for they had imbibed from their parents a vague idea of something horrible in this dreary woman gliding silently through the town, with never any companion but one only child.
It is remarkable that the visionary propensity I have mentioned is not confined to the native inhabitants of the valley, but is unconsciously imbibed by every one who resides there for a time.
Margaret, the other sister, was a good-humored, well-disposed girl; but as she had already imbibed a good deal of Marianne's romance, without having much of her sense, she did not, at thirteen, bid fair to equal her sisters at a more advanced period of life.
I had imbibed from her something of her nature and much of her habits: more harmonious thoughts: what seemed better regulated feelings had become the inmates of my mind.
the parentheses always referring to Dora, who was supposed, it appeared on explanation, to have imbibed the whole of these refreshments.
And with regard to what you say, senor, of your son having no great opinion of Spanish poetry, I am inclined to think that he is not quite right there, and for this reason: the great poet Homer did not write in Latin, because he was a Greek, nor did Virgil write in Greek, because he was a Latin; in short, all the ancient poets wrote in the language they imbibed with their mother's milk, and never went in quest of foreign ones to express their sublime conceptions; and that being so, the usage should in justice extend to all nations, and the German poet should not be undervalued because he writes in his own language, nor the Castilian, nor even the Biscayan, for writing in his.
Not only did she receive the whole society of the place at her house, not only was she charitable, pious, incapable of saying an unkind thing, but she was fully in accord with the spirit of the place and the habits and customs of the inhabitants, who liked her as the symbol of their lives; she was absolutely inlaid into the ways of the provinces; she had never quitted them; she imbibed all their prejudices; she espoused all their interests; she adored them.
Porthos swallowed the second glass with the same grace with which he had imbibed the first, took his beaver and followed D'Artagnan.
He was a young man of wonderful talents and great learning, who had imbibed the religious opinions of the Puritans, and left England with the intention of spending his life in Massachusetts.
But he had thought and felt so much, he had given so many of the best hours of his life to unworldly hopes for some great good to mankind, that it seemed as though he had been talking with the angels, and had imbibed a portion of their wisdom unawares.