imbrication


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im·bri·cate

 (ĭm′brĭ-kāt′)
adj.
Having regularly arranged, overlapping edges, as roof tiles or fish scales.
v. im·bri·cat·ed, im·bri·cat·ing, im·bri·cates
v.tr.
To overlap in a regular pattern.
v.intr.
To be arranged with regular overlapping edges.

[Latin imbricātus, covered with roof tiles, from imbrex, imbric-, roof tile, from imber, imbr-, rain.]

im′bri·ca′tion n.

im•bri•ca•tion

(ˌɪm brɪˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an overlapping, as of tiles or shingles.
2. a decoration or pattern resembling this.
[1640–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.imbrication - covering with a design in which one element covers a part of another (as with tiles or shingles)imbrication - covering with a design in which one element covers a part of another (as with tiles or shingles)
covering - an artifact that covers something else (usually to protect or shelter or conceal it)
References in periodicals archive ?
Reading Petrarchan lyrics by writers such as Joachin Du Bellay, Pierre de Ronsard, Philip Sidney, and Mary Wroth alongside Petrarch's originals and in the context of the Renaissance commentaries surrounding them, Kennedy vividly illustrates the close imbrication of early modern Petrarchism with emergent discourses of nation and shows how rival narratives of ethnic and national origin ground themselves in the political Petrarch bestowed upon later periods by these Italian commentaries.
SNORCLE images of offsets and imbrication of this reflectivity and the Moho (Fig.
79 In this ornament echoes the technologies of nature, whose strategies give rise to particular visual possibilities (in the manner of the imbrication of fish scales, or the interference patterns of butterfly wings).
Given this book's focus on the imbrication of language, disability, and materiality, it would have been an ideal site for interrogating this tradition and theorizing ways out of the gap.
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By looking at the ways in which 'apartment stories' are activated by the dissolution and imbrication of these apparently separate spheres, it underlines the extent to which the self representation of the contemporary bourgeoisie (let alone modem feminist commentary on it) is fissured by illuminating crossings and fault-lines.
Despite the efforts of the Pope and the Vatican apparatus to suppress this wide-ranging theological, spiritual, and political tendency, the imbrication of historical materialism and transformative spirituality in this grassroots movement continues to speak to people's conditions in ways that give them the hope and courage to believe that there can be an alternative to the current order of things and to struggle toward it.
This is not to deny the great variety in the papers, and the range of concerns apparent, which reveal that the Renaissance is set for a further extension of excellent research, informed by an engaging and seductive imbrication of multifarious theories with heterogeneous histories.
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WHITECHAPEL GALLERY * January 15--April 6 * Curated by Iwona Blazwick and Magnus af Petersens * Marking the centenary of Kazimir Malevich's iconic (in both senses of the word) Suprematist painting, this ambitious exhibition will examine abstraction as an international phenomenon, considering its relationship to politics, its potential as a catalyst for social change, and its imbrication with design.