imitable


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Related to imitable: inimitable, subtle

im·i·ta·ble

 (ĭm′ĭ-tə-bəl)
adj.
1. Capable of being imitated: the imitable sounds of a bird.
2. Worthy of imitation: imitable behavior.

im•i•ta•ble

(ˈɪm ɪ tə bəl)

adj.
capable or worthy of being imitated.
Translations

imitable

[ˈɪmɪtəbl] ADJimitable

imitable

adjnachahmbar, imitierbar

imitable

a. imitable.
References in classic literature ?
In dealing with the State we ought to remember that its institution are not aboriginal, though they existed before we were born; that they are not superior to the citizen; that every one of them was once the act of a single man; every law and usage was a man's expedient to meet a particular case; that they all are imitable, all alterable; we may make as good, we may make better.
A great historian, as he insisted on calling himself, who had the happiness to be dead a hundred and twenty years ago, and so to take his place among the colossi whose huge legs our living pettiness is observed to walk under, glories in his copious remarks and digressions as the least imitable part of his work, and especially in those initial chapters to the successive books of his history, where he seems to bring his armchair to the proscenium and chat with us in all the lusty ease of his fine English.
It could be upholstery, a hood ornament or air freshener - unique touches that reflect the band's own imitable spirit and personality.
According to Barney (1991), firms can achieve a competitive advantage based on resources that are firm-specific, valuable, rare, imperfectly imitable and not strategically substitutable by other resources.
Another popular approach has its roots in the resource-based view of the firm, which suggests that valuable firm resources--comprising tangible and intangible elements--are usually scarce, imperfectly imitable, and lacking in direct substitutes (Barney 1991).
In outlining the resource-based view (RBV) of the firm, Barney (1991) stated that to build sustained competitive advantage, a firm's resources must be valuable, rare, imperfectly imitable and have no strategically equivalent substitutes.
Third, the resource must be imperfectly imitable due to "isolating mechanisms" (Rumelt 1984) which prevent imitation by competitors (e.
This, once again, ignores a vast strategy and management literature, where internalized knowledge is sticky, not easily imitable, and where intellectual property (IP) such as brands and patents confers firm-specific advantages that last for a long time, if not indefinitely.
However, as with any resource that is imitable, substitutable and no longer rare, simply adopting an off-the-shelf technology might enhance performance but will likely not induce a long-term competitive advantage (Barney, 1991; Kros, Richey, Chen, & Nadler, 2011; Paulraj & Chen, 2007; Wade & Hulland, 2004).
Thus, potential competition among cooperating LSPs in the face of easily imitable services is of major importance in these cooperations.
Strategic resources are valuable, rare and imperfectly imitable and substitutable (Barney, 1991).