imitative

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im·i·ta·tive

 (ĭm′ĭ-tā′tĭv)
adj.
1. Of or involving imitation.
2. Not original; derivative.
3. Tending to imitate.
4. Onomatopoeic.

im′i·ta′tive·ly adv.
im′i·ta′tive·ness n.

imitative

(ˈɪmɪtətɪv)
adj
1. imitating or tending to imitate or copy
2. characterized by imitation
3. copying or reproducing the features of an original, esp in an inferior manner: imitative painting.
4. (Linguistics) another word for onomatopoeic
ˈimitatively adv
ˈimitativeness n

im•i•ta•tive

(ˈɪm ɪˌteɪ tɪv)

adj.
1. imitating; copying; given to imitation.
2. of, pertaining to, or characterized by imitation.
3. made in imitation of something; counterfeit.
4. onomatopoeic.
[1575–85; < Late Latin]
im′i•ta`tive•ly, adv.
im′i•ta`tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imitative - marked by or given to imitation; "acting is an imitative art"; "man is an imitative being"
nonimitative - not marked by or given to imitation
2.imitative - (of words) formed in imitation of a natural sound; "onomatopoeic words are imitative of noises"; "it was independently developed in more than one place as an onomatopoetic term"- Harry Hoijer
3.imitative - not genuine; imitating something superior; "counterfeit emotion"; "counterfeit money"; "counterfeit works of art"; "a counterfeit prince"
artificial, unreal - contrived by art rather than nature; "artificial flowers"; "artificial flavoring"; "an artificial diamond"; "artificial fibers"; "artificial sweeteners"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
insincere - lacking sincerity; "a charming but thoroughly insincere woman"; "their praise was extravagant and insincere"
false - not in accordance with the fact or reality or actuality; "gave false testimony under oath"; "false tales of bravery"

imitative

adjective
1. copying, mimicking, derivative, copycat (informal), unoriginal, mimetic, echoic Babies of this age are highly imitative.
2. copied, put-on, mimicking, similar, mock, second-hand, simulated, pseudo (informal), parrot-like, unoriginal, plagiarized, mimetic, onomatopoeic This may lead to excitement and to imitative behaviour.

imitative

adjective
1. Copying another in an inferior or obsequious way:
2. Imitating sounds:
Translations
مُقَلِّد، مُحاكٍ
napodobující
efterlignende
hermi-
napodobňujúci

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] ADJimitativo
a style imitative of Joyce'sun estilo que imita el de Joyce

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] adj
[person, animal] to be imitative → imiter ce que l'on fait
Babies of eight to twelve months are generally highly imitative → Les bébés de 8 à 12 mois imitent généralement tout ce que l'on fait.
[behaviour] → imitatif/ive

imitative

adjnachahmend, imitierend; children are naturally imitativeKinder machen von Natur aus alles nach

imitative

[ˈɪmɪtətɪv] adjimitativo/a

imitate

(ˈimiteit) verb
to (try to) be, behave or look the same as (a person etc). Children imitate their friends rather than their parents; He could imitate the song of many different birds.
ˌimiˈtation noun
1. the act of imitating. Children learn how to speak by imitation.
2. a copy. an imitation of an ancient statue.
adjective
made to look like something else. imitation wood.
ˈimitative (-tətiv) adjective
ˈimitativeness noun
ˈimitator noun
a person who imitates.
References in classic literature ?
Lawson painted in a certain way because it was his nature to, and through the imitativeness of a student sensitive to every influence, there pierced individuality.
As a white human parasite (all slave owners over historical time have been/are human parasites) on his Black slaves and their labor-power, Jefferson was a direct beneficiary of the putative dullness, tastelessness, anomalousness, and imitativeness that he discerned in Africans.
65) Much talk of a local jazz club, divided into two factions, traditional and advanced jazz fans; and remarked upon the complete imitativeness in ideas and popularity polls among their members of the American jazz scene.