imitate

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im·i·tate

 (ĭm′ĭ-tāt′)
tr.v. im·i·tat·ed, im·i·tat·ing, im·i·tates
1. To use or follow as a model: Your brother imitates you because he admires you.
2.
a. To copy the mannerisms or speech of; mimic: amused her friends by imitating the teachers.
b. To copy (mannerisms or speech): Can you imitate his accent?
3. To copy exactly; reproduce: "drugs that can imitate the hormone's positive effects while reducing its adverse effects" (The Scientist).
4. To appear like; resemble: a fishing lure that imitates a minnow.

[Latin imitārī, imitāt-; see aim- in Indo-European roots.]

im′i·ta′tor n.
Synonyms: imitate, copy, mimic, ape, parody, simulate
These verbs mean to follow something or someone taken as a model. To imitate is to act like or follow a pattern or style set by another: "The Blue Jay is ... a renowned vocal mimic, with the uncanny ability to imitate hawk calls" (Marie Read).
To copy is to duplicate an original as precisely as possible: "His grandfather had spent a laborious life-time in Rome, copying the Old Masters for a generation which lacked the facile resource of the camera" (Edith Wharton).
To mimic is to make a close imitation, often to ridicule: "[He] mimicked the vacuum salesman as he explained his attachments, clearing his throat before each sentence, twisting the phantom hose" (Deirdre McNamer).
To ape is to follow another's lead, often with an absurd result: "Those [superior] states of mind do not come from aping an alien culture" (John Russell).
To parody is either to imitate comically or to attempt a serious imitation and fail: "All these peculiarities [of Samuel Johnson's literary style] have been imitated by his admirers and parodied by his assailants" (Thomas Macaulay).
To simulate is to replicate something's appearance or character: "An ecological community can sometimes simulate the intricate harmony of a single organism" (Richard Dawkins).

imitate

(ˈɪmɪˌteɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to try to follow the manner, style, character, etc, of or take as a model: many writers imitated the language of Shakespeare.
2. to pretend to be or to impersonate, esp for humour; mimic
3. to make a copy or reproduction of; duplicate; counterfeit
4. to make or be like; resemble or simulate: her achievements in politics imitated her earlier successes in business.
[C16: from Latin imitārī; see image]
ˈimitable adj
ˌimitaˈbility, ˈimitableness n
ˈimiˌtator n

im•i•tate

(ˈɪm ɪˌteɪt)

v.t. -tat•ed, -tat•ing.
1. to follow as a model or example.
2. to mimic; impersonate.
3. to make a copy of; reproduce closely.
4. to have or assume the appearance of; simulate.
[1525–35; < Latin imitārī to copy]
im′i•ta`tor, n.

imitate


Past participle: imitated
Gerund: imitating

Imperative
imitate
imitate
Present
I imitate
you imitate
he/she/it imitates
we imitate
you imitate
they imitate
Preterite
I imitated
you imitated
he/she/it imitated
we imitated
you imitated
they imitated
Present Continuous
I am imitating
you are imitating
he/she/it is imitating
we are imitating
you are imitating
they are imitating
Present Perfect
I have imitated
you have imitated
he/she/it has imitated
we have imitated
you have imitated
they have imitated
Past Continuous
I was imitating
you were imitating
he/she/it was imitating
we were imitating
you were imitating
they were imitating
Past Perfect
I had imitated
you had imitated
he/she/it had imitated
we had imitated
you had imitated
they had imitated
Future
I will imitate
you will imitate
he/she/it will imitate
we will imitate
you will imitate
they will imitate
Future Perfect
I will have imitated
you will have imitated
he/she/it will have imitated
we will have imitated
you will have imitated
they will have imitated
Future Continuous
I will be imitating
you will be imitating
he/she/it will be imitating
we will be imitating
you will be imitating
they will be imitating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been imitating
you have been imitating
he/she/it has been imitating
we have been imitating
you have been imitating
they have been imitating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been imitating
you will have been imitating
he/she/it will have been imitating
we will have been imitating
you will have been imitating
they will have been imitating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been imitating
you had been imitating
he/she/it had been imitating
we had been imitating
you had been imitating
they had been imitating
Conditional
I would imitate
you would imitate
he/she/it would imitate
we would imitate
you would imitate
they would imitate
Past Conditional
I would have imitated
you would have imitated
he/she/it would have imitated
we would have imitated
you would have imitated
they would have imitated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.imitate - reproduce someone's behavior or looks; "The mime imitated the passers-by"; "Children often copy their parents or older siblings"
conform to, follow - behave in accordance or in agreement with; "Follow a pattern"; "Follow my example"
mock - imitate with mockery and derision; "The children mocked their handicapped classmate"
reproduce - make a copy or equivalent of; "reproduce the painting"
take off - mimic or imitate in an amusing or satirical manner; "This song takes off from a famous aria"
mime, mimic - imitate (a person or manner), especially for satirical effect; "The actor mimicked the President very accurately"
model, pattern - plan or create according to a model or models
take after, follow - imitate in behavior; take as a model; "Teenagers follow their friends in everything"
emulate - strive to equal or match, especially by imitating; "He is emulating the skating skills of his older sister"
2.imitate - appear like, as in behavior or appearance; "Life imitate art"
resemble - appear like; be similar or bear a likeness to; "She resembles her mother very much"; "This paper resembles my own work"
ape - imitate uncritically and in every aspect; "Her little brother apes her behavior"
emulate - imitate the function of (another system), as by modifying the hardware or the software
follow suit - do what someone else is doing
3.imitate - make a reproduction or copy of
re-create, copy - make a replica of; "copy that drawing"; "re-create a picture by Rembrandt"

imitate

verb
1. copy, follow, repeat, echo, emulate, ape, simulate, mirror, follow suit, duplicate, counterfeit, follow in the footsteps of, take a leaf out of (someone's) book a precedent which may be imitated by other activists
2. do an impression of, take off (informal), mimic, do (informal), affect, copy, mock, parody, caricature, send up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), impersonate, burlesque, personate He screwed up his face and imitated the Colonel.

imitate

verb
1. To take as a model or make conform to a model:
copy, emulate, follow, model (on, upon, or after), pattern (on, upon, or after).
Idioms: follow in the footsteps of, follow suit, follow the example of.
2. To copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way:
3. To copy (another) slavishly:
4. To make a copy of:
Translations
يُحاكي، يُقَلِّديُقَلِّدُ
napodobit
efterligneimitere
matkima
matkia
imitirati
imitálutánoz
líkja eftir
模倣する
모방하다
imitacijaimitatoriusimitavimasimituojantismėgdžiojantis
imitēt, atdarināt
posnemati
imitera
เลียนแบบ
bắt chướcnhái

imitate

[ˈɪmɪteɪt] VT [+ person, action, accent] → imitar (pej) → remedar; [+ signature, writing] → reproducir, copiar

imitate

[ˈɪmɪteɪt] vt
(= copy) → imiter
(= impersonate) → imiter

imitate

vt
(= copy) person, accent etcimitieren, nachmachen, nachahmen; children learn by imitating their parentsKinder lernen dadurch, dass sie ihre Eltern nachahmen
(= counterfeit)nachmachen, imitieren

imitate

[ˈɪmɪˌteɪt] vtimitare

imitate

(ˈimiteit) verb
to (try to) be, behave or look the same as (a person etc). Children imitate their friends rather than their parents; He could imitate the song of many different birds.
ˌimiˈtation noun
1. the act of imitating. Children learn how to speak by imitation.
2. a copy. an imitation of an ancient statue.
adjective
made to look like something else. imitation wood.
ˈimitative (-tətiv) adjective
ˈimitativeness noun
ˈimitator noun
a person who imitates.

imitate

يُقَلِّدُ napodobit efterligne imitieren μιμούμαι imitar matkia imiter imitirati imitare 模倣する 모방하다 imiteren imitere imitować imitar подражать imitera เลียนแบบ taklit etmek bắt chước 模仿

imitate

vt. imitar, copiar.
References in classic literature ?
Even the children would not be excluded; but boys, little able to wield the instruments, tore the tomahawks from the belts of their fathers, and stole into the ranks, apt imitators of the savage traits exhibited by their parents.
In less than two years from its erection, he had the pleasure of standing on the elevated platform, and of looking down on three humble imitators of its beauty.
Radcliffe's works, and charming even as were the works of all her imitators, it was not in them perhaps that human nature, at least in the Midland counties of England, was to be looked for.
in covers the country already had been flooded by its imitators with a
He was surrounded and followed by many imitators, and it is well to remember Dryden as the greatest of them all.
Throughout the fifteenth century the leading poets (of prose we will speak later) were avowed imitators of Chaucer, and therefore at best only second-rate writers.
Here I mean such imitators as Rowe was of Shakespear, or as Horace hints some of the Romans were of Cato, by bare feet and sour faces.
The room was empty, of course; but, as he stepped in, it became filled all at once with a stir of many people; because the strips of glass on the doors of wardrobes and his wife's large pier-glass reflected him from head to foot, and multiplied his image into a crowd of gentlemanly and slavish imitators, who were dressed exactly like himself; had the same restrained and rare gestures; who moved when he moved, stood still with him in an obsequious immobility, and had just such appearances of life and feeling as he thought it dignified and safe for any man to manifest.
You should speedily see a Historia Naturalis Americana, that would put the sneering imitators of the Frenchman, De Buffon, to shame
Being at my wits' end for want of money, and seeing what audiences Mathews drew, the idea occurred to me of starting an imitation of the great Imitator himself, in the shape of an "At Home," given by a woman.
Humble with the proud, haughty with the humble, encounterer of dangers, endurer of outrages, enamoured without reason, imitator of the good, scourge of the wicked, enemy of the mean, in short, knight-errant, which is all that can be said
So that from one point of view, Sophocles is an imitator of the same kind as Homer--for both imitate higher types of character; from another point of view, of the same kind as Aristophanes--for both imitate persons acting and doing.