immanent


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im·ma·nent

 (ĭm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Existing or remaining within; inherent: believed in a God immanent in humans.
2. Restricted entirely to the mind; subjective.

[Late Latin immanēns, immanent-, present participle of immanēre, to remain in : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin manēre, to remain; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

im′ma·nence, im′ma·nen·cy n.
im′ma·nent·ly adv.

immanent

(ˈɪmənənt)
adj
1. existing, operating, or remaining within; inherent
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) of or relating to the pantheistic conception of God, as being present throughout the universe. Compare transcendent3
[C16: from Latin immanēre to remain in, from im- (in) + manēre to stay]
ˈimmanence, ˈimmanency n
ˈimmanently adv

im•ma•nent

(ˈɪm ə nənt)

adj.
1. remaining within; indwelling; inherent.
2. (of the Deity) indwelling the universe, time, etc. Compare transcendent (def. 3).
[1525–35; < Late Latin immanēre to stay in its own place = Latin im- im-1 + manēre to stay]
im′ma•nent•ly, adv.
imminent, immanent - Imminent is "about to happen" and immanent is "inherent" or "pervading the material world."
See also related terms for inherent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.immanent - of a mental act performed entirely within the mind; "a cognition is an immanent act of mind"
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
transeunt, transient - of a mental act; causing effects outside the mind
2.immanent - of qualities that are spread throughout something; "ambition is immanent in human nature"; "we think of God as immanent in nature"
distributive - serving to distribute or allot or disperse

immanent

adjective inherent, innate, intrinsic, natural, internal, indigenous, subjective, congenital, inborn, hard-wired, indwelling hierarchy as the immanent principle of Western society
Translations

immanent

[ˈɪmənənt] ADJinmanente

immanent

[ˈɪmənənt] (formal) adjimmanent(e)

immanent

adjinnewohnend, immanent (also Philos); to be immanent in somethingeiner Sache (dat)eigen sein or innewohnen
References in classic literature ?
But his feeling goes beyond the mere physical and emotional delight of Chaucer and the Elizabethans; for him Nature is a direct manifestation of the Divine Power, which seems to him to be everywhere immanent in her; and communion with her, the communion into which he enters as he walks and meditates among the mountains and moors, is to him communion with God.
Every psychical phenomenon is characterized by what the scholastics of the Middle Ages called the intentional (also the mental) inexistence of an object, and what we, although with not quite unambiguous expressions, would call relation to a content, direction towards an object (which is not here to be understood as a reality), or immanent objectivity.
A group of about 17 whales refloated themselves over Monday night and were swimming well off shore and not considered to be in immanent danger of restranding, it said.
Summary: The United Nations has said that 750,000 people are at risk of immanent starvation as famine spreads to six out of eight of southern Somalia's regions.
At the heart of the Christian solution to the challenges posed by Gnostic ditheism, on the one side, and pagan pan- or cosmotheism, on the other, is (as Agamben emphasizes numerous times) a fundamentally unstable doctrine of the Trinity as an articulation of two inter-twined processes: one pertaining to God's eternal being, understood as a divine mode of self-relation, self-knowledge, or even auto-affection--an immanent trinity of substance; and one pertaining to God's eventful praxis--a trinity of revelation, or properly economic trinity, understood as the gratuitous dispensation of divine being in the world.
Harrower gives an exegesis of Luke--Acts to engage with Rahner's Rule of the Trinity: "The economic Trinity is the Immanent Trinity, and vice versa.
Section three begins with Deleuze's concept of desire; in terms of its difference from transcendent morality, essay eleven takes up desire in terms of its relation to an immanent ethics, central to which is the question of how desire comes to desire its own repression.
Russian sociologist Pitirim (1889-1968) is perhaps best known for his premise that sociocultural change was an immanent part of societies instead of something being brought about by external conditions.
The highly organized game of chess suggests immutable laws, precluding divine intervention and restoring the primacy of the immanent.
2) The paradigm of the immanent and economic Trinity can appear to suggest that there are two Trinities.
What, we must wonder, did Brentano intend by his concept of what has often been called immanent intentionality?
They include discussions of Plotinus on quality and immanent form, a comparison between Plotinus and Proclus on causality and sensible objects, some fundamental principles of the Neoplatonic philosophy of nature, Proclus on movers and divisibility as the integration of Aristotelian physics in Neoplatonic context, and Proclus on matter and physical necessity.