immanent


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im·ma·nent

 (ĭm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Existing or remaining within; inherent: believed in a God immanent in humans.
2. Restricted entirely to the mind; subjective.

[Late Latin immanēns, immanent-, present participle of immanēre, to remain in : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin manēre, to remain; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

im′ma·nence, im′ma·nen·cy n.
im′ma·nent·ly adv.

immanent

(ˈɪmənənt)
adj
1. existing, operating, or remaining within; inherent
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) of or relating to the pantheistic conception of God, as being present throughout the universe. Compare transcendent3
[C16: from Latin immanēre to remain in, from im- (in) + manēre to stay]
ˈimmanence, ˈimmanency n
ˈimmanently adv

im•ma•nent

(ˈɪm ə nənt)

adj.
1. remaining within; indwelling; inherent.
2. (of the Deity) indwelling the universe, time, etc. Compare transcendent (def. 3).
[1525–35; < Late Latin immanēre to stay in its own place = Latin im- im-1 + manēre to stay]
im′ma•nent•ly, adv.
imminent, immanent - Imminent is "about to happen" and immanent is "inherent" or "pervading the material world."
See also related terms for inherent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.immanent - of a mental act performed entirely within the mind; "a cognition is an immanent act of mind"
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
transeunt, transient - of a mental act; causing effects outside the mind
2.immanent - of qualities that are spread throughout something; "ambition is immanent in human nature"; "we think of God as immanent in nature"
distributive - serving to distribute or allot or disperse

immanent

adjective inherent, innate, intrinsic, natural, internal, indigenous, subjective, congenital, inborn, hard-wired, indwelling hierarchy as the immanent principle of Western society
Translations

immanent

[ˈɪmənənt] ADJinmanente

immanent

[ˈɪmənənt] (formal) adjimmanent(e)

immanent

adjinnewohnend, immanent (also Philos); to be immanent in somethingeiner Sache (dat)eigen sein or innewohnen
References in classic literature ?
But his feeling goes beyond the mere physical and emotional delight of Chaucer and the Elizabethans; for him Nature is a direct manifestation of the Divine Power, which seems to him to be everywhere immanent in her; and communion with her, the communion into which he enters as he walks and meditates among the mountains and moors, is to him communion with God.
Every psychical phenomenon is characterized by what the scholastics of the Middle Ages called the intentional (also the mental) inexistence of an object, and what we, although with not quite unambiguous expressions, would call relation to a content, direction towards an object (which is not here to be understood as a reality), or immanent objectivity.
One key concept that runs throughout Smith's book is Taylor's notion of the immanent frame, which Smith defines as "a constructed social space that frames our lives entirely within a natural (rather than supernatural) order;" it is a "circumscribed space of the modern social imaginary that precludes transcendence" (Smith, 2014, p.
Divine Freedom and the Doctrine of the Immanent Trinity: In Dialogue with Karl Barth and Contemporary Theology, 2nd Edition
Traffic Jams: Analysing Everyday Life through the Immanent Materialism of Deleuze & Guattari
The concept of concrete others is based on the Levinasian concept of the other in that it accepts the transcendental dimension of others; however, the concept of concrete others is different from the concept of the other because it emphasizes immanent dimensions of human beings and their multiple differences.
This leads to Roach distinguishing between the notions of 'immanent crisis' and what he calls 'immanent complementarity'--as that which represents 'the possibilities of linking immanent critique with societal order and new forms of subjectivity' (2010, p.
sees it, superposition also nicely describes the relation between the immanent and the economic Trinity: "the economic Trinity is superimposed on the eternal potentiality of the immanent Trinity and emerges in particularity in relationship to the creation" (153).
Edwards's purpose is to provide a survey and brief evaluation of different views as to what properties are (universals--transcendental or immanent, tropes, various forms of nominalism, and pluralism), develop and apply a methodology for approaching this task (identify the features properties are supposed to have and look at the roles they are alleged to play), and defend a pluralist position.
In the meeting, President Putin also implicitely indicated that an end to Gazprom s pipe gas export monopoly could be immanent.
In the following section, we will begin by examining how Deleuze sought to construct an immanent ontology by drawing from the conceptual resources provided by philosophers such as Scotus, Spinoza and Nietzsche.
The topics include theurgy and aesthetics in Dionysios the Areopagite, Proklos and Plethon on beauty, Agathias and the icon of the Archangel Michael, transcendent exemplarism and immanent realism in the philosophical work of John of Damaskos, and the historical memory of Byzantine iconoclasm in the 14th century as illustrated by Nikephoros Gregoras and Philotheos Kokkinos.