auscultation

(redirected from immediate auscultation)
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aus·cul·ta·tion

 (ô′skəl-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of listening.
2. Medicine The act of listening for sounds made by internal organs, as the heart and lungs, to aid in the diagnosis of certain disorders.

[Latin auscultātiō, auscultātiōn-, from auscultātus, past participle of auscultāre, to listen to; see ous- in Indo-European roots.]

auscultation

(ˌɔːskəlˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Medicine) the diagnostic technique in medicine of listening to the various internal sounds made by the body, usually with the aid of a stethoscope
2. the act of listening
[C19: from Latin auscultātiō a listening, from auscultāre to listen attentively; related to Latin auris ear]
auscultatory, auscultative adj

aus•cul•ta•tion

(ˌɔ skəlˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of listening, either directly or through a stethoscope or other instrument, to sounds within the body as a method of diagnosis.
[1625–35; < Latin auscultātiō act of listening <ausultāre to listen <ausouris ear]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.auscultation - listening to sounds within the body (usually with a stethoscope)auscultation - listening to sounds within the body (usually with a stethoscope)
diagnostic procedure, diagnostic technique - a procedure followed in making a medical diagnosis
pleximetry, percussion - tapping a part of the body for diagnostic purposes
succussion - shaking a person to determine whether a large amount of liquid is present in a body cavity
listening, hearing - the act of hearing attentively; "you can learn a lot by just listening"; "they make good music--you should give them a hearing"
Translations

auscultation

nAbhören nt

aus·cul·ta·tion

n. auscultación, acto de auscultar, detección de sonidos en un examen directo o por medio del estetoscopio.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly 150 years later, Francois Mayor, a forensic physician in Geneva, rediscovered the technique of immediate auscultation.
With immediate auscultation being rendered inadmissible by the age and sex of the patient, Laennec happened to recollect a simple and well-known fact in acoustics: "The augmented impression of sound when conveyed through certain solid bodies, as when we hear the scratch of a pin at one end of a piece of wood, on applying our ear to the other.

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