immediatism


Also found in: Wikipedia.

immediatism

(ɪˈmiːdɪəˌtɪzəm)
n
the policy of taking immediate action

immediatism

immediateness; the quality or condition of being immediate.
See also: Time
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
To give a recent example: The immediatism of the media, as in the case of the recent terror bombings in Istanbul's Sultan Ahmet quarter, led to a decrease of tourist bookings by 40 per cent.
Guarneri, "Brook Farm and the Fourierist Phalanxes: Immediatism, Gradualism, and American Utopian Socialism," in Pitzer, America's Communal Utopias, 160-68.
1816); David Brion Davis, The Emergence of Immediatism in British and American Antislavery Thought, 49 MISS.
Mott was an early convert to antislavery immediatism, Faulkner suggests even before William Lloyd Garrison, and remained dedicated to the cause of free produce long after the abolitionist luminary.
Mott's embrace of this position predated that of almost all the major white players in American abolitionism, even William Lloyd Garrison, the supposed father of immediatism, whom, Faulkner suggests, Mott helped groom.
Kautsky and Bebel reasoned that the immediatism of the American utopia flagrantly violated the ineluctable tendencies of history, recklessly rushed historical destiny, and put the achievements of the socialists at risk.
Tellingly, the most ardent proponents of immediatism, Cyrille Bissette and Victor Schoelcher, were outside of the mainstream of antislavery activism throughout the era (Schmidt; Jennings, 2000).
In 1834, long before he achieved fame as a poet, the young John Greenleaf Whittier took note of the success of immediatism in Britain, and wrote to fellow Quakers in the United States: God "has smiled upon the cause of Emancipation.
Subsequent to the publication of David Walker's Appeal in 1829 and his mysterious death in 1831, indications of the growth of a more militant position was evident with the appearance of the idea of immediatism (immediate emancipation), the annual Colored Convention movement (dominated in the '40s by the more militant delegates), and the establishment of the Foreign and American Antislavery Society in response to the gradualism of the American and New England Antislavery societies of the Garrisonians.
This dehistoricizing immediatism is alleged to allow for people's authentic values to surface, for authentic relationships between participants to emerge and to create the space for the "authentic integrity and value" of one's business work to emerge (Shambhala Institute).
For the revivalists, this kind of immediatism translated into demands for "the great fundamental principle of immediate abolition" in the hands of abolitionists such as Garrison, Henry Ward Beecher, Elizur Wright, and Theodore Dwight Weld.
During these years, as Klaus Hansen relates, "the old paternalistic reform impulse directed toward social control yielded to a romantic reform movement impelled by millennialism, immediatism, and individualism.