imminent


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Related to imminent: Imminent Domain

im·mi·nent

 (ĭm′ə-nənt)
adj.
About to occur; impending: in imminent danger.

[Middle English iminent, from Old French imminent, from Latin imminēns, imminent-, present participle of imminēre, to overhang : in-, in; see in-2 + -minēre, to jut, threaten; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

im′mi·nent·ly adv.
im′mi·nent·ness n.

imminent

(ˈɪmɪnənt)
adj
1. liable to happen soon; impending
2. obsolete jutting out or overhanging
[C16: from Latin imminēre to project over, from im- (in) + -minēre to project; related to mons mountain]
ˈimminence, ˈimminentness n
ˈimminently adv

im•mi•nent

(ˈɪm ə nənt)

adj.
1. likely to occur at any moment; impending: Her death is imminent.
2. projecting or leaning forward; overhanging.
[1520–30; < Latin imminēre to overhang]
im′mi•nent•ly, adv.
im′mi•nent•ness, n.

imminent

, immanent - Imminent is "about to happen" and immanent is "inherent" or "pervading the material world."
See also related terms for inherent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imminent - close in timeimminent - close in time; about to occur; "retribution is at hand"; "some people believe the day of judgment is close at hand"; "in imminent danger"; "his impending retirement"
close - at or within a short distance in space or time or having elements near each other; "close to noon"; "how close are we to town?"; "a close formation of ships"

imminent

imminent

adjective
About to occur at any moment:
Translations
داهِم، وَشيك الوُقوع
blízkýhrozící
közelgõ
yfirvofandi
gresiantisneišvengiamumas
draudošsnenovēršams
eli kulağındayakın

imminent

[ˈɪmɪnənt] ADJ (= impending) → inminente

imminent

[ˈɪmɪnənt] adjimminent(e)

imminent

adjnahe bevorstehend; to be imminentnahe bevorstehen; I think an announcement is imminentich glaube, es steht eine Ankündigung bevor

imminent

[ˈɪmɪnənt] adjimminente

imminent

(ˈiminənt) adjective
(especially of something unpleasant) likely to happen etc very soon. A storm is imminent.
ˈimminence noun

imminent

a. inminente; irremediable.
References in classic literature ?
He considered me as the cause of his overwhelming disgrace, his imminent peril of death, his irretrievable ruin.
Such was the young clergyman's condition, and so imminent the prospect that his dawning light would be extinguished, all untimely, when Roger Chillingworth made his advent to the town.
His greatest admirer could not have cordially justified his bringing his harpoon into breakfast with him, and using it there without ceremony; reaching over the table with it, to the imminent jeopardy of many heads, and grappling the beefsteaks towards him.
But when the danger was most imminent, we were saved in a mysterious way.
Then at once they reached and hovered upon the imminent verge of sleep -- but an intruder came, now, that would not "down.
She grew cross and wearisome; snapping at and teasing Catherine continually, at the imminent risk of exhausting her limited patience.
Even when dislodged, he still kept the letter in his mouth; and on my endeavouring to take it from him, at the imminent risk of being bitten, he kept it between his teeth so pertinaciously as to suffer himself to be held suspended in the air by means of the document.
The lapse of time during which a given event has not happened, is, in this logic of habit, constantly alleged as a reason why the event should never happen, even when the lapse of time is precisely the added condition which makes the event imminent.
The whole appearance of the dungeon might have appalled a stouter heart than that of Isaac, who, nevertheless, was more composed under the imminent pressure of danger, than he had seemed to be while affected by terrors, of which the cause was as yet remote and contingent.
There has been no opportunity for that," replied the captive, "since she left Algiers, her native country and home; and up to the present she has not found herself in any such imminent danger of death as to make it necessary to baptise her before she has been instructed in all the ceremonies our holy mother Church ordains; but, please God, ere long she shall be baptised with the solemnity befitting her which is higher than her dress or mine indicates.
Do we owe debts to foreigners and to our own citizens contracted in a time of imminent peril for the preservation of our political existence?
It is not yet forgotten that well-grounded apprehensions of imminent danger induced the people of America to form the memorable Congress of 1774.