immoralist


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im·mor·al·ist

 (ĭ-môr′ə-lĭst)
n.
An advocate of immorality.

immoralist

(ɪˈmɒrəlɪst)
n
a person who advocates or practises immorality
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
His reasons, however, for choosing Zarathustra of all others to be his mouthpiece, he gives us in the following words:-- "People have never asked me, as they should have done, what the name Zarathustra precisely means in my mouth, in the mouth of the first Immoralist; for what distinguishes that philosopher from all others in the past is the very fact that he was exactly the reverse of an immoralist.
Those who like may peep down under waves that are pretty transparent and see it writhing and twirling, diabolically hideous and slimy, flapping amongst bones, or curling round corpses; but above the waterline, I ask, has not everything been proper, agreeable, and decorous, and has any the most squeamish immoralist in Vanity Fair a right to cry fie?
Robert Cunninghame-Graham's Mogreb-el-Acksa (1898), Andre Gide's The Immoralist (1902) and Norman Douglas' Fountains in the Sand (1912) had described, respectively, Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia.
12) Fred the Immoralist is the subject of a brief, provocative article by Steven M.
In contrast to earlier works like Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890) or Gide's The Immoralist (1902), the gay content in Wings isn't just hinted at or implied (Gore Vidal's The City and the Pillar is explicit, but wasn't published until 1948).
4 Neither can he be likened to Michel, the immoralist hero in Gide's novel also titled Limmoraliste (The Immoralist), who was said to live by his own rules as opposed to the norms of the new social environment.
It is no coincidence, therefore, that the progenitor of today's "Magi," British economist John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946), once declared, "I remain, and always will remain, an immoralist.
Wikipedia reports that this immoralist served on the board of directors of the New York Stock Exchange at the time of Dick Grasso's $187.
He is an immoralist who operates outside the framework of a value system or belief in an ultimate Lawgiver and Judge.
10) Callicles is the immoralist depicted in Plato's Gorgias.
For a discussion of the importance of this declaration to Nietzsche's thought overall, see Peter Berkowitz, Nietzsche: The Ethics of an Immoralist (Harvard University Press, 1995), especially 14-21.
Nietzsche's being an immoralist and his critique of compassion, then, did not entail a rejection of all ethical ideals; they served his particular moralist vision (Berkowitz, 1995).