impartial


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im·par·tial

 (ĭm-pär′shəl)
adj.
Not partial or biased; unprejudiced. See Synonyms at fair1.

im′par·ti·al′i·ty (-shē-ăl′ĭ-tē), im·par′tial·ness n.
im·par′tial·ly adv.

impartial

(ɪmˈpɑːʃəl)
adj
not prejudiced towards or against any particular side or party; fair; unbiased
imˌpartiˈality, imˈpartialness n
imˈpartially adv

im•par•tial

(ɪmˈpɑr ʃəl)

adj.
not partial or biased; fair; just: an impartial judge.
[1585–95]
im•par`ti•al′i•ty (-ʃiˈæl ɪ ti) im•par′tial•ness, n.
im•par′tial•ly, adv.
syn: See fair1.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.impartial - showing lack of favoritism; "the cold neutrality of an impartial judge"
fair, just - free from favoritism or self-interest or bias or deception; conforming with established standards or rules; "a fair referee"; "fair deal"; "on a fair footing"; "a fair fight"; "by fair means or foul"
partial - showing favoritism
2.impartial - free from undue bias or preconceived opinions; "an unprejudiced appraisal of the pros and cons"; "the impartial eye of a scientist"
receptive, open - ready or willing to receive favorably; "receptive to the proposals"

impartial

adjective neutral, objective, detached, just, fair, equal, open-minded, equitable, disinterested, unbiased, even-handed, nonpartisan, unprejudiced, without fear or favour, nondiscriminating They offer impartial advice, guidance and information to students.
unfair, prejudiced, biased, partial, influenced, swayed, unjust, bigoted

impartial

adjective
2. Not inclining toward or actively taking either side in a matter under dispute:
Idiom: on the fence.
Translations
غَيْرُ مُتَحَيِّزٍنَزيه، غَيْر مُنْحاز
nestranný
upartisk
unparteiischunparteilich
erapooletu
puolueeton
nepristran
óhlutdrægur
偏らない
공평한
bešališkai
objektīvstaisnīgs
nestranný
nepristranski
objektiv
ไม่ลำเอียง
không thiên vị

impartial

[ɪmˈpɑːʃəl] ADJimparcial

impartial

[ɪmˈpɑːrʃəl] adj [observer, judge, advice, opinion] → impartial(e)

impartial

impartial

[ɪmˈpɑːʃl] adjimparziale

impartial

(imˈpaːʃəl) adjective
not favouring one person etc more than another. an impartial judge.
imˈpartially adverb
imˌpartiˈality (-ʃiˈӕ-) noun

impartial

غَيْرُ مُتَحَيِّزٍ nestranný upartisk unparteiisch αμερόληπτος imparcial puolueeton impartial nepristran imparziale 偏らない 공평한 onpartijdig upartisk bezstronny imparcial беспристрастный objektiv ไม่ลำเอียง yansız không thiên vị 不偏不倚的

impartial

a. imparcial.
References in classic literature ?
It will be a great help to have cool, impartial persons take a look at it, and tell me what they think of it.
Had there been one there sufficiently disengaged to become a close observer, he might have fancied that the services of the young chief were not entirely impartial.
here then, from three impartial witnesses, i had a deliberate statement of the entire case.
here, far water-locked; beyond all hum of human weal or woe; in these most candid and impartial seas; where to traditions no rocks furnish tablets; where for long Chinese ages, the billows have still rolled on speechless and unspoken to, as stars that shine upon the Niger's unknown source; here, too, life dies sunwards full of faith; but see
I was not quite impartial in my judgment, Emma:but yet, I think had you not been in the caseI should still have distrusted him.
I look at those boys," the philosopher was accustomed to say, "with a perfectly impartial eye; I dismiss the unimportant accident of their birth from all consideration; and I find them below the average in every respect.
Though both were hardened and inflexible villains, the sight of the captive maiden, as well as her excelling beauty, at first appeared to stagger them; but an expressive glance from the Preceptor of Templestowe restored them to their dogged composure; and they delivered, with a precision which would have seemed suspicious to more impartial judges, circumstances either altogether fictitious or trivial, and natural in themselves, but rendered pregnant with suspicion by the exaggerated manner in which they were told, and the sinister commentary which the witnesses added to the facts.
The reader will here find no regions cursed with irremediable barrenness, or blessed with spontaneous fecundity, no perpetual gloom or unceasing sunshine; nor are the nations here described either devoid of all sense of humanity, or consummate in all private and social virtues; here are no Hottentots without religion, polity, or articulate language, no Chinese perfectly polite, and completely skilled in all sciences: he will discover, what will always be discovered by a diligent and impartial inquirer, that wherever human nature is to be found there is a mixture of vice and virtue, a contest of passion and reason, and that the Creator doth not appear partial in his distributions, but has balanced in most countries their particular inconveniences by particular favours.
The experiment has, however, demonstrated that this expectation was ill-founded and illusory; and the observations, made under the last head, will, I imagine, have sufficed to convince the impartial and discerning, that there is an absolute necessity for an entire change in the first principles of the system; that if we are in earnest about giving the Union energy and duration, we must abandon the vain project of legislating upon the States in their collective capacities; we must extend the laws of the federal government to the individual citizens of America; we must discard the fallacious scheme of quotas and requisitions, as equally impracticable and unjust.
It went to the extreme length of directly opposing the "brutally destructive" tendency of Communism, and of proclaiming its supreme and impartial contempt of all class struggles.
I might answer, sire, that he is too deeply interested in the question to be a very impartial witness; but so far from that, sire, I know the duke to be a royal gentleman, and I refer the matter to him--but upon one condition, sire.
The next morning, as soon as he awoke, Danglars asked for the newspapers; they were brought to him; he laid aside three or four, and at last fixed on the Impartial, the paper of which Beauchamp was the chief editor.