impeach


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im·peach

 (ĭm-pēch′)
tr.v. im·peached, im·peach·ing, im·peach·es
1.
a. To make an accusation against: impeach someone of a crime.
b. To bring formal charges against (a public official) for wrongdoing while in office.
2. To raise doubts about; discredit or disparage: impeach a witness's credibility; impeach someone's character.

[Middle English empechen, to impede, accuse, from Anglo-Norman empecher, from Late Latin impedicāre, to entangle : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin pedica, fetter; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

im·peach′a·ble adj.
im·peach′a·bil′i·ty n.
im·peach′er n.
im·peach′ment n.
Usage Note: When an irate citizen demands that a disfavored public official be impeached, the citizen clearly intends for the official to be removed from office. This popular use of impeach as a synonym of "throw out" (even if by due process) does not accord with the legal meaning of the word. When a public official is impeached, that is, formally accused of wrongdoing, this is only the start of what can be a lengthy process that may or may not lead to the official's removal from office. In strict usage, an official is impeached (accused), tried, and then convicted or acquitted. The vaguer use of impeach reflects disgruntled citizens' indifference to whether the official is forced from office by legal means or chooses to resign to avoid further disgrace.

impeach

(ɪmˈpiːtʃ)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) criminal law to bring a charge or accusation against
2. (Law) criminal law Brit to accuse of a crime, esp of treason or some other offence against the state
3. (Law) chiefly US to charge (a public official) with an offence committed in office
4. to challenge or question (a person's honesty, integrity, etc)
[C14: from Old French empeechier, from Late Latin impedicāre to entangle, catch, from Latin im- (in) + pedica a fetter, from pēs foot]
imˈpeacher n

im•peach

(ɪmˈpitʃ)
v.t.
1. to accuse (a public official) of misconduct in office by bringing charges before an appropriate tribunal.
2. to challenge the credibility of: to impeach a witness.
3. to bring an accusation against.
4. to cast an imputation upon: to impeach a person's motives.
5. to remove (a public official) from office for misconduct.
n.
6. Obs. impeachment.
[1350–1400; Middle English empechen, enpeshen to impede, accuse < Anglo-French empecher < Late Latin impedicāre to fetter, trap = Latin im- im-1 + -pedicāre, v. derivative of pedica fetter, derivative of pēs foot]
im•peach′er, n.
usage: The correct legal sense of impeach refers only to the bringing of formal charges against an official. Since the purpose of impeachment is the removal from office of an official who has engaged in misconduct, many people focus on the intended result and use impeach to mean “to remove (a public official) from office.” This sense is likely to cause confusion, and people should be aware of the word's proper legal meaning.

impeach


Past participle: impeached
Gerund: impeaching

Imperative
impeach
impeach
Present
I impeach
you impeach
he/she/it impeaches
we impeach
you impeach
they impeach
Preterite
I impeached
you impeached
he/she/it impeached
we impeached
you impeached
they impeached
Present Continuous
I am impeaching
you are impeaching
he/she/it is impeaching
we are impeaching
you are impeaching
they are impeaching
Present Perfect
I have impeached
you have impeached
he/she/it has impeached
we have impeached
you have impeached
they have impeached
Past Continuous
I was impeaching
you were impeaching
he/she/it was impeaching
we were impeaching
you were impeaching
they were impeaching
Past Perfect
I had impeached
you had impeached
he/she/it had impeached
we had impeached
you had impeached
they had impeached
Future
I will impeach
you will impeach
he/she/it will impeach
we will impeach
you will impeach
they will impeach
Future Perfect
I will have impeached
you will have impeached
he/she/it will have impeached
we will have impeached
you will have impeached
they will have impeached
Future Continuous
I will be impeaching
you will be impeaching
he/she/it will be impeaching
we will be impeaching
you will be impeaching
they will be impeaching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been impeaching
you have been impeaching
he/she/it has been impeaching
we have been impeaching
you have been impeaching
they have been impeaching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been impeaching
you will have been impeaching
he/she/it will have been impeaching
we will have been impeaching
you will have been impeaching
they will have been impeaching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been impeaching
you had been impeaching
he/she/it had been impeaching
we had been impeaching
you had been impeaching
they had been impeaching
Conditional
I would impeach
you would impeach
he/she/it would impeach
we would impeach
you would impeach
they would impeach
Past Conditional
I would have impeached
you would have impeached
he/she/it would have impeached
we would have impeached
you would have impeached
they would have impeached
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.impeach - challenge the honesty or veracity of; "the lawyers tried to impeach the credibility of the witnesses"
challenge - issue a challenge to; "Fischer challenged Spassky to a match"
2.impeach - charge (a public official) with an offense or misdemeanor committed while in office; "The President was impeached"
lodge, file, charge - file a formal charge against; "The suspect was charged with murdering his wife"
3.impeach - bring an accusation against; level a charge against; "The neighbors accused the man of spousal abuse"
reproach, upbraid - express criticism towards; "The president reproached the general for his irresponsible behavior"
accuse, charge - blame for, make a claim of wrongdoing or misbehavior against; "he charged the director with indifference"
arraign - accuse of a wrong or an inadequacy
recriminate - return an accusation against someone or engage in mutual accusations; charge in return
lodge, file, charge - file a formal charge against; "The suspect was charged with murdering his wife"

impeach

verb charge, accuse, prosecute, blame, denounce, indict, censure, bring to trial, arraign an opposition move to impeach the President
Translations
obvinit ze zločinu
felelõsségre von
ákæra; kæra fyrir embættisbrot
apkaltaapkaltinti nusikaltimu valstybeipaskelbti apkaltą
apsūdzēt
obviniť zo zločinu

impeach

[ɪmˈpiːtʃ] VT
1. (= doubt) [+ character, motive] → poner en tela de juicio; [+ witness] → recusar
2. [+ public official] (= accuse) → acusar de prevaricación; (= try) → procesar por prevaricación; [+ president] → someter a un proceso de destitución

impeach

[ɪmˈpiːtʃ] vt [+ president] → mettre en cause pénalement

impeach

vt
(Jur: = accuse) public official(eines Amtsvergehens) anklagen; (US) presidentein Amtsenthebungsverfahren or Impeachment einleiten gegen; to impeach somebody for somethingjdn wegen einer Sache anklagen; to impeach somebody for doing somethingjdn anklagen, etw getan zu haben
(= challenge) sb’s character, motivesinfrage or in Frage stellen, anzweifeln; witness’s testimony alsoanfechten; to impeach a witnessdie Glaubwürdigkeit eines Zeugen anzweifeln or anfechten

impeach

[ɪmˈpiːtʃ] vt
a. (esp Am) (prosecute, public official) → mettere in stato d'accusa
b. (challenge, character, motive) → mettere in dubbio

impeach

(imˈpiːtʃ) verb
to accuse of a crime, especially to accuse a person who works for the government of a crime against the State.
imˈpeachment noun
References in classic literature ?
How, in fact, could a majority in the House of Representatives impeach themselves?
I intend to impeach you for making use of the powers entrusted to you for your own private ends
What are we to say to the men who profess the most flaming zeal for republican government, yet boldly impeach the fundamental principle of it; who pretend to be champions for the right and the capacity of the people to choose their own rulers, yet maintain that they will prefer those only who will immediately and infallibly betray the trust committed to them?
From the time of that parting, Dorothea, believing in Will's love for her, believing with a proud delight in his delicate sense of honor and his determination that no one should impeach him justly, felt her heart quite at rest as to the regard he might have for Mrs.
And when he had told them all about the case, and that he had never known a worse case, he stopped a little while, like a man who had something terrible to tell them, and then said that he understood an attempt would be made by his learned friend (and here he looked sideways at Kit's gentleman) to impeach the testimony of those immaculate witnesses whom he should call before them; but he did hope and trust that his learned friend would have a greater respect and veneration for the character of the prosecutor; than whom, as he well knew, there did not exist, and never had existed, a more honourable member of that most honourable profession to which he was attached.
Here are three instances, then, which I personally know the truth of; but I have heard of many other instances from persons whose veracity in the matter there is no good ground to impeach.
I denounce this person as a liar, and impeach him as a coward.
You impeach my sober judgment and make my canons of little worth.
Sereno made the statement one day after the House of Representatives' Committee on Justice found probable cause to impeach her over allegations she failed to declare all her financial assets, including hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees.
The county assemblies and the Senate have found it difficult to impeach deputy governors.
Voting 38-2, the House of Representatives Committee on Justice declared on Thursday that it has found probable cause to impeach Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno.
Sereno, who is widely expected to be impeached by congressmen, went on 'indefinite leave' starting March 1 to prepare for his impending impeachment trial at the Senate, which would become an impeachment court after the House of Representatives transmits the impeach complaint against the top magistrate to the upper chamber.