impeachment

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im·peach

 (ĭm-pēch′)
tr.v. im·peached, im·peach·ing, im·peach·es
1.
a. To make an accusation against: impeach someone of a crime.
b. To bring formal charges against (a public official) for wrongdoing while in office.
2. To raise doubts about; discredit or disparage: impeach a witness's credibility; impeach someone's character.

[Middle English empechen, to impede, accuse, from Anglo-Norman empecher, from Late Latin impedicāre, to entangle : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin pedica, fetter; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

im·peach′a·ble adj.
im·peach′a·bil′i·ty n.
im·peach′er n.
im·peach′ment n.
Usage Note: When an irate citizen demands that a disfavored public official be impeached, the citizen clearly intends for the official to be removed from office. This popular use of impeach as a synonym of "throw out" (even if by due process) does not accord with the legal meaning of the word. When a public official is impeached, that is, formally accused of wrongdoing, this is only the start of what can be a lengthy process that may or may not lead to the official's removal from office. In strict usage, an official is impeached (accused), tried, and then convicted or acquitted. The vaguer use of impeach reflects disgruntled citizens' indifference to whether the official is forced from office by legal means or chooses to resign to avoid further disgrace.

impeachment

(ɪmˈpiːtʃmənt)
n
1. (Parliamentary Procedure) rare (in England) committal by the House of Commons, esp of a minister of the Crown, for trial by the House of Lords. The last instance occurred in 1805
2. (Law) (in the US) a proceeding brought against a federal government official
3. (Law) an accusation or charge
4. obsolete discredit; reproach

im•peach•ment

(ɪmˈpitʃ mənt)

n.
1. the act of impeaching; condition of being impeached.
2. (in the U.S. Congress or a state legislature) the presentation of charges against a public official by the lower house, with trial to be before the upper house.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French]

impeachment

The charging of a public official before a quasipolitical body with having committed an offense while in office.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impeachment - a formal document charging a public official with misconduct in officeimpeachment - a formal document charging a public official with misconduct in office
legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument - (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right

impeachment

noun accusation, prosecution, indictment, arraignment Unconstitutional actions would be grounds for impeachment.
Translations
مُحاكَمَة أو إتهام رئيس الجمهوريَّه
obvinění ze zločinu
rigsretssag
vád alá helyezés
ákæra, lögsókn
obvinenie zo zločinu

impeachment

[ɪmˈpiːtʃmənt]
A. N (= accusation) → acusación f de prevaricación; (= trial) → proceso m por prevaricación; [of president] → proceso m de destitución
B. CPD impeachment hearing Njuicio m por destitución
impeachment proceedings NPLproceso m de destitución

impeachment

[ɪmˈpiːtʃmənt] n [president] → procédure f de l'impeachment, mise f en cause de la responsabilité pénale

impeachment

n
(Jur: = accusation) → Anklage f (wegen eines Amtsvergehens); (US: of president) → Amtsenthebungsverfahren nt, → Impeachment nt
(= questioning) (of sb’s character, motives)Infragestellung f, → Anzweiflung f; (of testimony also)Anfechtung f

impeachment

[ɪmˈpiːtʃmənt] n (Law) → impeachment m inv

impeach

(imˈpiːtʃ) verb
to accuse of a crime, especially to accuse a person who works for the government of a crime against the State.
imˈpeachment noun
References in classic literature ?
THE remaining powers which the plan of the convention allots to the Senate, in a distinct capacity, are comprised in their participation with the executive in the appointment to offices, and in their judicial character as a court for the trial of impeachments.
A well-constituted court for the trial of impeachments is an object not more to be desired than difficult to be obtained in a government wholly elective.
As well the latter, as the former, seem to have regarded the practice of impeachments as a bridle in the hands of the legislative body upon the executive servants of the government.
The awful discretion which a court of impeachments must necessarily have, to doom to honor or to infamy the most confidential and the most distinguished characters of the community, forbids the commitment of the trust to a small number of persons.
These considerations seem alone sufficient to authorize a conclusion, that the Supreme Court would have been an improper substitute for the Senate, as a court of impeachments.
No part of the arrangement, according to some, is more inadmissible than the trial of impeachments by the Senate, which is alternately a member both of the legislative and executive departments, when this power so evidently belonged to the judiciary department.
The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments.
The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.
Judgment in cases of Impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from Office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any Office of honor, Trust or Profit under the United States: but the Party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to Indictment, Trial, Judgment and Punishment, according to Law.
The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the United States, except in Cases of impeachment.
The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.
Then come impeachments and judgments and trials of one another.