imperfect


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Related to imperfect: Imperfect competition, imperfect tense

im·per·fect

 (ĭm-pûr′fĭkt)
adj.
1. Not perfect.
2. Grammar Of or being the tense of a verb that shows, usually in the past, an action or a condition as incomplete, continuous, or coincident with another action.
3. Botany Having either stamens or a pistil only. Used of a flower.
4. Not reproducing sexually. Used of fungi.
5. Law Potentially unenforceable; limited or defective: an imperfect right of self defense.
n.
1. A piece of merchandise having a minor flaw that does not impair its use, usually sold at a discount.
2. Grammar
a. The imperfect tense.
b. A verb in the imperfect tense.

[Middle English imparfit, from Old French imparfait, from Latin imperfectus : in-, not; see in-1 + perfectus, perfect; see perfect.]

im·per′fect·ly adv.
im·per′fect·ness n.

imperfect

(ɪmˈpɜːfɪkt)
adj
1. exhibiting or characterized by faults, mistakes, etc; defective
2. not complete or finished; deficient
3. (Botany) botany
a. (of flowers) lacking functional stamens or pistils
b. (of fungi) not undergoing sexual reproduction
4. (Grammar) grammar denoting a tense of verbs used most commonly in describing continuous or repeated past actions or events, as for example was walking as opposed to walked
5. (Law) law (of a trust, an obligation, etc) lacking some necessary formality to make effective or binding; incomplete; legally unenforceable. See also executory1
6. (Classical Music) music
a. (of a cadence) proceeding to the dominant from the tonic, subdominant, or any chord other than the dominant
b. of or relating to all intervals other than the fourth, fifth, and octave. Compare perfect9
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the imperfect tense
b. a verb in this tense
imˈperfectly adv
imˈperfectness n

im•per•fect

(ɪmˈpɜr fɪkt)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or characterized by defects or weaknesses: imperfect vision.
2. lacking completeness: imperfect knowledge.
3. of or designating a verb tense or form typically indicating a habitual, repeated, or continuing action or state in the past or an action or state in progress at a point of reference in the past, as Spanish hablaban “they used to speak” or “they were speaking.”
4. not enforceable by law.
5. (of a flower) having either stamens or pistils; unisexual.
n.
6. the imperfect tense.
7. a verb form in the imperfect tense.
[1300–50; Middle English imparfit < Middle French imparfait < Latin imperfectus unfinished]
im•per′fect•ly, adv.
im•per′fect•ness, n.

imperfect

Used to describe a verb form that expresses an uncompleted or ongoing action, as in “We were walking.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.imperfect - a tense of verbs used in describing action that is on-going
tense - a grammatical category of verbs used to express distinctions of time
present progressive, present progressive tense - a tense used to express action that is on-going at the time of utterance
past progressive, past progressive tense - a progressive tense used to describe on-going action in the past; "`I had been running' is an example of the past progressive"
future progressive, future progressive tense - a progressive tense used to express action that will be on-going in the future; "`I will be running' is an example of the future progressive"
Adj.1.imperfect - not perfect; defective or inadequate; "had only an imperfect understanding of his responsibilities"; "imperfect mortals"; "drainage here is imperfect"
blemished - marred by imperfections
broken - physically and forcibly separated into pieces or cracked or split; "a broken mirror"; "a broken tooth"; "a broken leg"; "his neck is broken"
perfect - being complete of its kind and without defect or blemish; "a perfect circle"; "a perfect reproduction"; "perfect happiness"; "perfect manners"; "a perfect specimen"; "a perfect day"
2.imperfect - wanting in moral strength, courage, or will; having the attributes of man as opposed to e.g. divine beings; "I'm only a fallible human"; "frail humanity"
human - having human form or attributes as opposed to those of animals or divine beings; "human beings"; "the human body"; "human kindness"; "human frailty"

imperfect

imperfect

adjective
Having a defect or defects:
Translations
غَير تامفيه عَيْب
imperfektnívadný
datidfejlbehæftetimperfektummangelfuld
folyamatos múlt idõtökéletlen
gallaîurólokiî horf í òátíî
eigos veikslasnetobulaisu defektu
ar defektiem/trūkumiemimperfektsnepabeigtsnepilnīgs
nedokonavý
bitmemiş eylem gösterenhatalıkusurlu

imperfect

[ɪmˈpɜːfɪkt]
A. ADJ
1. (= faulty) [machine, product] → defectuoso; [hearing, vision] → deficiente; [understanding, world, method] → imperfecto; [knowledge] → incompleto, limitado; [reasoning] → deficiente, incorrecto
2. (Ling) [tense] → imperfecto
B. N (Ling) → imperfecto m
a verb in the imperfectun verbo en imperfecto

imperfect

[ɪmˈpɜːrfɪkt]
adj
[world, human being] → imparfait(e)
We live in an imperfect world → Nous vivons dans un monde imparfait.
We have to accept ourselves as imperfect human beings → Nous devons nous accepter comme des êtres imparfaits.
(= incomplete) [knowledge, understanding] → imparfait(e)
[tool, substitute] → imparfait(e)
[goods, merchandise] → présentant des imperfections
They sell slightly imperfect merchandise at low prices → Ils vendent à bas prix des marchandises présentant de légères imperfections.
n (also imperfect tense) → imparfait m
in the imperfect → à l'imparfait

imperfect

adj
(= faulty)unvollkommen, mangelhaft; (Comm) goodsfehlerhaft
(= incomplete)unvollständig, unvollkommen
(Gram) → Imperfekt-, Vergangenheits-; imperfect formImperfekt- or Vergangenheitsform f
n (Gram) → Imperfekt nt, → Vergangenheit f

imperfect

[ɪmˈpɜːfɪkt]
1. adj
a. (gen) → difettoso/a
b. (Gram) → imperfetto/a
2. n (Gram) (also imperfect tense) → imperfetto
in the imperfect → all'imperfetto

imperfect

(imˈpəːfikt) adjective
1. having a fault. This coat is being sold at half-price because it is imperfect.
2. (also noun) (a verb) of the tense expressing an action or state in the past which is not completed. The verb `go' in `I was going' is in the imperfect tense.
imˈperfectly adverb
ˌimperˈfection (-ˈfekʃən) noun
(the state of having) a fault or defect.

imperfect

n. tiempo imperfecto;
a. imperfecto-a; defectuoso-a.
References in classic literature ?
Koku, the giant, who was in the hall, opened the door and in his imperfect English asked:
He at once explained that the black woman's offensive conduct was all due to imperfect training, as he was not there to take her in hand.
The Indian riveted his glowing eyes on Heyward as he asked, in his imperfect English, "Is he alone?
Wandering gusts laden with the deep resinous odors of the wood found their way through the imperfect jointure of the two cabins, swept her cheek and even stirred her long, wide-open lashes.
But I was not born a gentleman; neither have I lived like one," said Holgrave, slightly smiling; "so, my dear madam, you will hardly expect me to sympathize with sensibilities of this kind; though, unless I deceive myself, I have some imperfect comprehension of them.
Nothing, if I rightly call to mind, was left of my respected predecessor, save an imperfect skeleton, and some fragments of apparel, and a wig of majestic frizzle, which, unlike the head that it once adorned, was in very satisfactory preservation.
It was nearly six o'clock, but only grey imperfect misty dawn, when we drew nigh the wharf.
I believe, had I stayed there very long, I should have become purblind, and that would have been a great misfortune, for I have heard men say that a stone-blind horse was safer to drive than one which had imperfect sight, as it generally makes them very timid.
But as a perishable perfect man must die, and leave his despotism in the hands of an imperfect successor, an earthly despotism is not merely a bad form of government, it is the worst form that is possible.
Descriptions of such a work as this must necessarily be imperfect, yet they are of value.
He cried, he pleaded for forgiveness, promised to reform over and over again, and then received his dismissal, feeling that he had won but an imperfect forgiveness and established but a feeble confidence.
The whole was tied up for the benefit of this child, who, in occasional visits with his father and mother at Norland, had so far gained on the affections of his uncle, by such attractions as are by no means unusual in children of two or three years old; an imperfect articulation, an earnest desire of having his own way, many cunning tricks, and a great deal of noise, as to outweigh all the value of all the attention which, for years, he had received from his niece and her daughters.