imperfective aspect


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perfective aspect and imperfective aspect

Aspect is a grammatical term that has to do with how an action, state of being, or event unfolds in relation to time. The greatest distinction is made between the perfective aspect, which focuses on actions and events as whole elements, and the imperfective aspect, which deconstructs how an event is structured and located in time.
While other languages may mark the difference with an inflected verb form, English instead relies on a combination of particles, verbs, verb phrases, and lexical clues to determine whether the overall meaning of the action is perfective or imperfective.
The perfective aspect highlights actions, states, or events as a whole, presenting the actions from an outside perspective as complete, bounded events.
The imperfective aspect, on the other hand, is used when we focus on the internal structures of an action, state, or event as it relates to time, such as being continuous or habitual (repeating).
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imperfective aspect

An aspect of verbs that expresses action without reference to its completion or beginning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.imperfective aspect - aspect without regard to the beginning or completion of the action of the verb
durative, durative aspect - the aspect of a verb that expresses its duration
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in Bhujel the stative verbs can be combined with grammatical imperfective aspect and it yields a durative interpretation as in (9).
29) assumes that Russian imperfectivising suffixes originally had an iterative meaning and only later began to mark the imperfective aspect.
Comrie (1976: 24-25) also subdivided the imperfective aspect into "habitual" and "continuous," the latter including "progressive.
Subordinate clauses, negative propositional modality, preterite tense, nonindicative (subjunctive or imperative) mood, imperfective aspect, plural number and transitivity of the verb were presumed as <com grammatical environment.
According to Comrie (1976), Dowty (1979), and Klein (1994), among others, the perfective aspect in (lb) entails that the event of drawing a flower is complete; on the other hand, the imperfective aspect in (la) remains neutral about the completion of the event, which Wagner (2002: 122) terms "a lack of entailment".
It is certainly true that used to and would translate the imperfective aspect of, say, French (3, 4), when the progressive is inappropriate, as does the simple past tense (5):
This relates the problem of coming into existence to an array of modal concepts underlying the application of the imperfective aspect to telic verbs; and also to the well-known Vendler categories of state, activity, accomplishment, and achievement.
In the sentence there is a low level of transitivity: its subject is not an agent, the situation is not dynamic; the sentence is not a statement but a question, the verb is of imperfective aspect and in the present tense; the object is not concrete or countable (Kortvely 2005 : 155).
For example, the imperfective aspect of "write" is expressed by pisat' and the perfective aspect is expressed by napisat'.
It would be extremely interesting to find out how these children mix both perfective and imperfective aspect in narratives (in describing, introducing, explaining, and commenting).
imperfective aspect, but that it actually is imperfective aspect.
There are two basic choices: in the imperfective aspect, TT is included in TSit, which, metaphorically speaking, "views the situation from its inside, as ongoing;" in the perfective aspect, TT includes TSit, which amounts to the "outside view" in which the situation is shown as "completed.