impermanency


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im·per·ma·nent

 (ĭm-pûr′mə-nənt)
adj.
Not lasting or durable; not permanent.

im·per′ma·nence, im·per′ma·nen·cy n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impermanency - the property of not existing for indefinitely long durations
length, duration - continuance in time; "the ceremony was of short duration"; "he complained about the length of time required"
temporariness - the property of lasting only a short time
transience, transiency, transitoriness - an impermanence that suggests the inevitability of ending or dying
mortality - the quality or state of being mortal
References in classic literature ?
It was not devotion to an outdoor life, but the frequentation of foreign cafes which was responsible for that habit, investing with a character of unceremonious impermanency Mr Verloc's steady fidelity to his own fireside.
Their single-minded dedication to these inconstant & passing pleasures serves to remind us, as Ishigura wrote, "of the permanent impermanency of life, smoke as a moment's monument to the vanity of human wishes & the insufficiency of desire.
You told me once your father was a Don Juan, that it was his faithlessness which had affected your childhood, giving you a feeling of impermanency.
That one person in 42 percent of new marriages each year has already been divorced reflects impermanency.
To observers of progressive persuasion his sense of the impermanency of ideas and intellectual axioms became "realism" or "sociologial jurisprudence"; his willingness to defer to the wishes of those holding positions of political power became a belief in social experimentation; his tendency to believe that social upheavals were infrequent and that words alone rarely threatened the fabric of society became a faith in free speech; his general indifference to social problems and political issues became enlightened judicial self-restraint.