impermanent

(redirected from impermanently)
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im·per·ma·nent

 (ĭm-pûr′mə-nənt)
adj.
Not lasting or durable; not permanent.

im·per′ma·nence, im·per′ma·nen·cy n.

impermanent

(ɪmˈpɜːmənənt)
adj
not permanent; fleeting; transitory
imˈpermanence, imˈpermanency n
imˈpermanently adv

im•per•ma•nent

(ɪmˈpɜr mə nənt)

adj.
not permanent; transitory.
[1645–55]
im•per′ma•nence, n.
im•per′ma•nent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.impermanent - not permanent; not lasting; "politics is an impermanent factor of life"- James Thurber; "impermanent palm cottages"; "a temperary arrangement"; "temporary housing"
unstable - lacking stability or fixity or firmness; "unstable political conditions"; "the tower proved to be unstable in the high wind"; "an unstable world economy"
lasting, permanent - continuing or enduring without marked change in status or condition or place; "permanent secretary to the president"; "permanent address"; "literature of permanent value"
2.impermanent - existing or enduring for a limited time only
finite - bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent

impermanent

adjective temporary, passing, brief, fleeting, elusive, mortal, short-lived, flying, fugitive, transient, momentary, ephemeral, transitory, perishable, fly-by-night (informal), evanescent, inconstant, fugacious, here today, gone tomorrow (informal) Looking at the sky reminds me how impermanent we all are.

impermanent

adjective
Intended, used, or present for a limited time:
Translations

impermanent

[ɪmˈpɜːmənənt] ADJimpermanente

impermanent

adjunbeständig

impermanent

[ɪmˈpɜːmənənt] adjtransitorio/a
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result of Jordan's explicitly exclusionary policies, Syrian refugees remain impermanently permanent (3)--not fully Jordanian but also not simply transiting.
The idea of living "on the go", impermanently, for part of the year or for a big part of one's life, is now part of Southeast Asian modernity.
It would appear, therefore, that Paris's chronicles were either unbound or impermanently bound until close to his death, if not after it, allowing him to add, adapt, or remove material.