impermanent

(redirected from impermanently)
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im·per·ma·nent

 (ĭm-pûr′mə-nənt)
adj.
Not lasting or durable; not permanent.

im·per′ma·nence, im·per′ma·nen·cy n.

impermanent

(ɪmˈpɜːmənənt)
adj
not permanent; fleeting; transitory
imˈpermanence, imˈpermanency n
imˈpermanently adv

im•per•ma•nent

(ɪmˈpɜr mə nənt)

adj.
not permanent; transitory.
[1645–55]
im•per′ma•nence, n.
im•per′ma•nent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.impermanent - not permanent; not lasting; "politics is an impermanent factor of life"- James Thurber; "impermanent palm cottages"; "a temperary arrangement"; "temporary housing"
unstable - lacking stability or fixity or firmness; "unstable political conditions"; "the tower proved to be unstable in the high wind"; "an unstable world economy"
lasting, permanent - continuing or enduring without marked change in status or condition or place; "permanent secretary to the president"; "permanent address"; "literature of permanent value"
2.impermanent - existing or enduring for a limited time only
finite - bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent

impermanent

adjective temporary, passing, brief, fleeting, elusive, mortal, short-lived, flying, fugitive, transient, momentary, ephemeral, transitory, perishable, fly-by-night (informal), evanescent, inconstant, fugacious, here today, gone tomorrow (informal) Looking at the sky reminds me how impermanent we all are.

impermanent

adjective
Intended, used, or present for a limited time:
Translations

impermanent

[ɪmˈpɜːmənənt] ADJimpermanente

impermanent

adjunbeständig

impermanent

[ɪmˈpɜːmənənt] adjtransitorio/a
References in periodicals archive ?
A mean and miserable architecture repeats itself, jumbled streets like tapeworms affront the eye - the homes of miners pitched impermanently on the heaving, ravaged earth.
The unsubtle point of Strathern's analysis is to remove sex and affect from the consideration of social life and to make anatomy lose all meaning: 'differences between the sexes cannot be known in advance of the interaction between them,' because '[m]ale and female organs "in themselves" stand for a composite relation' any element of which is elicted situationally, impermanently, by identically-pansexual 'others' (Strathern 1988: 123, 129).
All traditions and all identities are more "an amalgam of impermanently related bits and pieces" than the pristine singularities assumed in shorthand labels.