impertinent


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im·per·ti·nent

 (ĭm-pûr′tn-ənt)
adj.
1. Exceeding the limits of propriety or good manners; improperly forward or bold: scolded the impertinent child for talking rudely.
2. Not pertinent: See Synonyms at irrelevant.

[Middle English, irrelevant, from Old French, from Late Latin impertinēns, impertinent- : Latin in-, not; see in-1 + Latin pertinēns, pertinent; see pertinent.]

im·per′ti·nent·ly adv.

impertinent

(ɪmˈpɜːtɪnənt)
adj
1. rude; insolent; impudent
2. irrelevant or inappropriate
[C14: from Latin impertinēns not belonging, from Latin im- (not) + pertinēre to be relevant; see pertain]
imˈpertinently adv

im•per•ti•nent

(ɪmˈpɜr tn ənt)

adj.
1. intrusively presumptuous; rude.
2. not pertinent; irrelevant: an impertinent detail.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin]
im•per′ti•nent•ly, adv.
im•per′ti•nent•ness, n.
syn: impertinent, impudent, insolent refer to bold and rude persons or behavior. impertinent, from its primary meaning of not pertinent and hence inappropriate or out of place, has come to imply an unseemly intrusion into the affairs of others; it may also refer to a presumptuous rudeness toward persons entitled to respect: impertinent questions; an impertinent interruption. impudent suggests a bold and shameless rudeness: an impudent young rascal. insolent suggests the insulting or contemptuous behavior of an arrogant person: The boss fired the insolent employee.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.impertinent - characterized by a lightly pert and exuberant quality; "a certain irreverent gaiety and ease of manner"
spirited - displaying animation, vigor, or liveliness
2.impertinent - not pertinent to the matter under consideration; "an issue extraneous to the debate"; "the price was immaterial"; "mentioned several impertinent facts before finally coming to the point"
irrelevant - having no bearing on or connection with the subject at issue; "an irrelevant comment"; "irrelevant allegations"
3.impertinent - improperly forward or bold; "don't be fresh with me"; "impertinent of a child to lecture a grownup"; "an impudent boy given to insulting strangers"; "Don't get wise with me!"
forward - used of temperament or behavior; lacking restraint or modesty; "a forward child badly in need of discipline"

impertinent

adjective
1. rude, forward, cheeky (informal), saucy (informal), fresh (informal), bold, flip (informal), brazen, sassy (U.S. informal), pert, disrespectful, presumptuous, insolent, impolite, impudent, lippy (U.S. & Canad. slang), discourteous, uncivil, unmannerly I don't like strangers who ask impertinent questions.
rude mannerly, polite, respectful
2. inappropriate, irrelevant, incongruous, inapplicable Since we already knew this, to tell us again seemed impertinent.
inappropriate important, appropriate, relevant, vital, pertinent, germane

impertinent

adjective
Translations
وقِح
drzý
fræknæsvis
ósvífinn, ruddalegur
atžarus
bezkaunīgsnekaunīgs
nesramenpredrzen

impertinent

[ɪmˈpɜːtɪnənt] ADJ [person, child, behaviour, manner] → impertinente, insolente
to be impertinent to sbser impertinente or insolente con algn
don't be impertinent!¡no seas impertinente!

impertinent

[ɪmˈpɜːrtɪnənt] adjimpertinent(e)

impertinent

adj
(= impudent)unverschämt (to zu, gegenüber), impertinent (dated)(to gegenüber)
(form: = irrelevant) → irrelevant

impertinent

[ɪmˈpɜːtɪnənt] adj impertinent (to)impertinente (con or nei confronti di)

impertinent

(imˈpəːtinənt) adjective
impudent or rude. She was impertinent to her teacher.
imˈpertinently adverb
imˈpertinence noun
References in classic literature ?
In transcribing his notes and fortifying their claim to attention by giving them something of an orderly arrangement, I have conscientiously refrained from embellishing them with such small ornaments of diction as I may have felt myself able to bestow, which would not only have been impertinent, even if pleasing, but would have given me a somewhat closer relation to the work than I should care to have and to avow.
Some, whatsoever is beyond their reach, will seem to despise, or make light of it, as impertinent or curious; and so would have their ignorance seem judgment.
I like him on the whole very well; he is clever and has a good deal to say, but he is sometimes impertinent and troublesome.
But, my dear Marianne, as it has already exposed you to some very impertinent remarks, do you not now begin to doubt the discretion of your own conduct?
It was generally evident whenever they met, that he DID admire her and to HER it was equally evident that Jane was yielding to the preference which she had begun to entertain for him from the first, and was in a way to be very much in love; but she considered with pleasure that it was not likely to be discovered by the world in general, since Jane united, with great strength of feeling, a composure of temper and a uniform cheerfulness of manner which would guard her from the suspicions of the impertinent.
They are very often amazingly impertinent if you do not treat them with spirit, and make them keep their distance.
As we disapprove of a child's being taught to understand instruments, and to play like a master (which we would have confined to those who are candidates for the prize in that science; for they play not to improve themselves in virtue, but to please those who hear them, and gratify their importunity); therefore we think the practice of it unfit for freemen; but then it should be confined to those who are paid for doing it; for it usually gives people sordid notions, for the end they have in view is bad: for the impertinent spectator is accustomed to make them change their music; so that the artists who attend to him regulate their bodies according to his motions.
Another burst of laughter, even more impertinent than the first, was heard in the quiet field.
As to what he urged on this occasion, as I am convinced most of my readers will be much abler advocates for poor Jones, it would be impertinent to relate it.
While we smile at the simplicity of his heart and the narrowness of his views, which made him regard everything out of the direct path of his daily duty, and the rigid exigencies of the service, as trivial and impertinent, which inspired him with contempt for the swelling vanity of some of his coadjutors, and the literary exercises and curious researches of others, we cannot but applaud that strict and conscientious devotion to the interests of his employer, and to what he considered the true objects of the enterprise in which he was engaged.
And they are so confoundedly impertinent, too, over it.
When I remembered the deliberate and impertinent moralizing of Thackeray, the clumsy exegesis of George Eliot, the knowing nods and winks of Charles Reade, the stage-carpentering and limelighting of Dickens, even the fine and important analysis of Hawthorne, it was with a joyful astonishment that I realized the great art of Tourguenief.