implicature

(redirected from implicatures)

im·plic·a·ture

 (ĭm-plĭk′ə-chər)
n. Linguistics
1. The aspect of meaning that a speaker conveys, implies, or suggests without directly expressing. Although the utterance "Can you pass the salt?" is literally a request for information about one's ability to pass salt, the understood implicature is a request for salt.
2. The process by which such a meaning is conveyed, implied, or suggested. In saying "Some dogs are mammals," the speaker conveys by implicature that not all dogs are mammals.

implicature

(ɪmˈplɪkətʃə)
n
1. (Logic) a proposition inferred from the circumstances of utterances of another proposition rather than from its literal meaning, as when an academic referee writes the candidate's handwriting is excellent to convey that he has nothing relevant to commend
2. (Logic) the relation between the uttered and the inferred statement
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, language inputs regularly feature complex linguistic phenomena such as lexical and referential ambiguity, ellipsis, false starts, spurious repetitions, semantically vacuous fillers, nonliteral language, indirect speech acts, implicatures, and production errors.
Schroeder's explanation for why they should not be trusted turns on pragmatic implicatures about reasons with low weights.
For instance, Roever (2005) examined pragmatic performance by a group of German students of English as a Second Language (ESL) in the US, in comparison with a control group of EFL learners in Germany, and addressed the effect of proficiency and exposure on learners' recognition of pragmatic routines, comprehension of implicatures and production of speech acts.
In particular, courts recognize many of the same sorts of Gricean implicatures as do interlocutors in ordinary conversation.
Implicatures, on the other hand, are implications that are derived purely from contextually-based inferences.
Meibauer presents a new approach to lying in this linguistic study, viewing it as an act that comprises deliberately false implicatures and presuppositions.
for misleading with linguistic implicatures and an ethical distinction between deception by false assertion and by false conversational implicature.
In the definition of verbal irony as a cognitive stylistic tool, Wilson and Sperber interlace contextual effects and implicatures of each utterance.
Implicatures are what is implied by the act of saying what is said in the context in which it is said, Implicitures are what is implied in what is said and are part of what is said.
Skalarne implikature na razmeli pragmatike i sintakse (Scalar Implicatures at the Interface between Pragmatics and Syntax), 3.
2013), "It's Not What You Said, It's the Way You Said It: Slurs and Conventional Implicatures," Analytic Philosophy.
Vindicating and debunking narratives are normatively charged, but there is another category of narrative, which we might dub "causal," that focuses on causal relationships between actions and events--although a causal narrative might also have normative implicatures.