implied reader

Translations

implied reader

n (Liter) → fiktiver Leser (als Bestandteil der literarischen Fiktion)
References in periodicals archive ?
Sometimes there is a tension between these stances in terms of the implied reader.
However, Glendinning's implied reader is perhaps not the philosophical novice, rather the curious student or scholar made wary by Derrida's reputation and the hostility of the tradition.
The implied reader would recognize the Addams cartoon and the map of Toad's wild ride, might look up the headline at the library, should have a box full of similar family photographs.
A substantial minority of authors have ignored this guideline, with varying success, and as the market for crossover fiction grows (Falconer 2), the age of the implied reader becomes a fuzzier concept.
To the implied reader new to this terrain, a question is likely to arise: can Shakespeare really accommodate all of these perspectives and agendas with equal facility?
The paper attempts to tackle the hyphenated self of Maria Edgeworth as Anglo-Irish writer in her books for children and young adults, reflected not only in the fact of the occasional introduction of Irish characters or Irish setting but also at the deeper level of the identity of the narrative voice and the implied reader of these texts.
He argues that a novel's meaning emerges only as it is read, and so when he speaks of the implied reader, he is assigning him or her a special role.
In narrative criticism the implied reader is a hypothetical concept: it is not necessary to assume that such a person actually existed or ever could exist.
In the introduction to The Implied Reader, Iser addresses the question as to which kind of aesthetic, literary text would best enable an author to present the reader with an experience analogous to negotiating the living, natural world and its corresponding crisis.
Hope's method is partly hermeneutical--his own carefully researched interpretation of the author's investment in the text--and partly a review of contemporary critical reactions, with some guesswork regarding the social composition of the readership proceeding in rather circular fashion by extrapolating an implied reader out of the text itself (e.
Galbraith's book concerns itself with real readers, or rather with adult memories or visions of what "real" child readers might be; Mitchell's examines that more elusive but ultimately also more manageable creature the ideal or implied reader, arguing nonetheless that various authors' shared vision of the tastes and demands of a particular breed of reader offers a window into the desires of real girls, and perhaps into the effect ("virtually impossible to demonstrate," she concedes [6]) that such texts might have had upon the worldview of their audience.
In Sha'rawi's memoir he is also her nemesis and the greatest test of her narrative skill: Can she overcome popular adulation of Sa'd to show his offenses toward her and his mistakes toward Egypt without losing the sympathy of her implied reader (although by the time she wrote, Sa'd-debunking was by no means without an audience)?