impose


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im·pose

 (ĭm-pōz′)
v. im·posed, im·pos·ing, im·pos·es
v.tr.
1. To establish or apply as compulsory; levy: impose a tax.
2. To bring about by authority or force; force to prevail: impose a peace settlement.
3. To obtrude or force (oneself, for example) on another or others.
4. Printing To arrange (type or plates) on an imposing stone.
5. To offer or circulate fraudulently; pass off: imposed a fraud on consumers.
v.intr.
To force oneself on or take unfair advantage of others: You are always imposing on their generosity.

[Middle English imposen, from Old French imposer, alteration (influenced by poser, to put, place) of Latin impōnere, to place upon : in-, on; see in-2 + pōnere, to place; see apo- in Indo-European roots.]

im·pos′er n.

impose

(ɪmˈpəʊz)
vb
1. (tr) to establish as something to be obeyed or complied with; enforce: to impose a tax on the people.
2. to force (oneself, one's presence, etc) on another or others; obtrude
3. (intr) to take advantage, as of a person or quality: to impose on someone's kindness.
4. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (tr) printing to arrange (pages) so that after printing and folding the pages will be in the correct order
5. (tr) to pass off deceptively; foist: to impose a hoax on someone.
6. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (tr) (of a bishop or priest) to lay (the hands) on the head of a candidate for certain sacraments
[C15: from Old French imposer, from Latin impōnere to place upon, from pōnere to place, set]
imˈposable adj
imˈposer n

im•pose

(ɪmˈpoʊz)

v. -posed, -pos•ing. v.t.
1. to apply or establish by or as if by authority: to impose taxes.
2. to thrust intrusively upon others: to impose oneself uninvited.
3. to pass or palm off fraudulently or deceptively.
4. to lay (type pages, plates, etc.) in proper order on a slab of stone or metal and secure in a chase for printing.
5. to inflict, as a penalty.
v.i.
6. to obtrude oneself or one's needs upon others: Are you sure my request doesn't impose?
[1475–85; < Middle French imposer < Latin impōnere to put in or upon, impose =im- im-1 + pōnere to put, place]
im•pos′a•ble, adj.
im•pos′er, n.

impose


Past participle: imposed
Gerund: imposing

Imperative
impose
impose
Present
I impose
you impose
he/she/it imposes
we impose
you impose
they impose
Preterite
I imposed
you imposed
he/she/it imposed
we imposed
you imposed
they imposed
Present Continuous
I am imposing
you are imposing
he/she/it is imposing
we are imposing
you are imposing
they are imposing
Present Perfect
I have imposed
you have imposed
he/she/it has imposed
we have imposed
you have imposed
they have imposed
Past Continuous
I was imposing
you were imposing
he/she/it was imposing
we were imposing
you were imposing
they were imposing
Past Perfect
I had imposed
you had imposed
he/she/it had imposed
we had imposed
you had imposed
they had imposed
Future
I will impose
you will impose
he/she/it will impose
we will impose
you will impose
they will impose
Future Perfect
I will have imposed
you will have imposed
he/she/it will have imposed
we will have imposed
you will have imposed
they will have imposed
Future Continuous
I will be imposing
you will be imposing
he/she/it will be imposing
we will be imposing
you will be imposing
they will be imposing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been imposing
you have been imposing
he/she/it has been imposing
we have been imposing
you have been imposing
they have been imposing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been imposing
you will have been imposing
he/she/it will have been imposing
we will have been imposing
you will have been imposing
they will have been imposing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been imposing
you had been imposing
he/she/it had been imposing
we had been imposing
you had been imposing
they had been imposing
Conditional
I would impose
you would impose
he/she/it would impose
we would impose
you would impose
they would impose
Past Conditional
I would have imposed
you would have imposed
he/she/it would have imposed
we would have imposed
you would have imposed
they would have imposed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.impose - compel to behave in a certain way; "Social relations impose courtesy"
compel, obligate, oblige - force somebody to do something; "We compel all students to fill out this form"
2.impose - impose something unpleasantimpose - impose something unpleasant; "The principal visited his rage on the students"
communicate, intercommunicate - transmit thoughts or feelings; "He communicated his anxieties to the psychiatrist"
dictate, prescribe, order - issue commands or orders for
obtrude, intrude - thrust oneself in as if by force; "The colors don't intrude on the viewer"
clamp - impose or inflict forcefully; "The military government clamped a curfew onto the capital"
give - inflict as a punishment; "She gave the boy a good spanking"; "The judge gave me 10 years"
foist - to force onto another; "He foisted his work on me"
3.impose - impose and collect; "levy a fine"
toll - charge a fee for using; "Toll the bridges into New York City"
tithe - levy a tithe on (produce or a crop); "The wool was tithed"
reimpose - impose anew; "The fine was reimposed"
lay - impose as a duty, burden, or punishment; "lay a responsibility on someone"
mulct - impose a fine on; "he was fined for littering"
tax - levy a tax on; "The State taxes alcohol heavily"; "Clothing is not taxed in our state"
bill, charge - demand payment; "Will I get charged for this service?"; "We were billed for 4 nights in the hotel, although we stayed only 3 nights"
distrain - levy a distress on

impose

verb
impose on someone intrude on, exploit, take advantage of, use, trouble, abuse, bother, encroach on, horn in (informal), trespass on, gate-crash (informal), take liberties with, butt in on, presume upon, force yourself on, obtrude on I was afraid you'd think we were imposing on you.
impose something on or upon someone
1. levy, apply, introduce, put, place, set, charge, establish, lay, fix, institute, exact, decree, ordain They impose fines on airlines who bring in illegal immigrants.
2. inflict, force, enforce, visit, press, apply, thrust, dictate, saddle (someone) with, foist Beware of imposing your own tastes on your children.

impose

verb
1. To establish and apply as compulsory:
2. To set forth expressly and authoritatively:
3. To cause to undergo or bear (something unwelcome or damaging, for example):
4. To force (another) to accept a burden:
Informal: stick.
5. To take advantage of unfairly:
Translations
يَفْرِض عَلىيَفْرِض على، يُجْبِريَفْرِضُ نَفْسَه على
uvalitvynucovat sizavéstzneužít
pålæggepåtvinge
määrätäsäätää
rásózvámot vet ki
leggja ánotfæra sér, misnotaòröngva upp á
primestiprimetimasuždėjimas
apliktuzbāztiesuzplītiesuzspiestuztiept
uvaliťvynucovať si
naložitivsiliti
külfet yüklemekuygulamakyürürlüğe koymakzahmetine sokmakzorla kabul ettirmek

impose

[ɪmˈpəʊz]
A. VT [+ condition, fine, tax] → imponer (on a) (Jur) [+ sentence] → imponer
troops were brought in to impose orderse movilizaron tropas para imponer el orden
he tries to impose his views on everyone elseintenta imponer sus puntos de vista a los demás
to impose o.s. on sbabusar de la amabilidad de algn
I couldn't possibly impose myself on you for dinnerestaría abusando de su amabilidad si me quedara a cenar
B. VI to impose (up)on (= take advantage of) [+ kindness, hospitality] → abusar de
I don't wish to impose (upon you)no quiero abusar, no quiero molestar(le)

impose

[ɪmˈpəʊz] vt
[+ fine] → imposer
[+ condition, taste] → imposer
impose on
vt fus (= take advantage of) [+ person] → abuser de la gentillesse de
I was afraid you'd feel we were imposing on you → J'avais peur que tu croies que nous abusions de ta gentillesse.

impose

vt
task, conditionsaufzwingen, auferlegen (on sb jdm); sanctions, fine, sentenceverhängen (on gegen); taxerheben; opinions, tasteaufzwingen (on sb jdm); to impose a tax on somethingetw mit einer Steuer belegen, etw besteuern; the pressures imposed upon teachersder Druck, dem Lehrer ausgesetzt sind
to impose oneself or one’s presence on somebodysich jdm aufdrängen; he imposed himself on them for three monthser ließ sich einfach drei Monate bei ihnen nieder
vizur Last fallen (on sb jdm); I don’t wish to imposeich möchte Ihnen nicht zur Last fallen

impose

[ɪmˈpəʊz] vt (conditions, fine, tax) to impose (sth on sb)imporre (qc a qn)
impose (up)on vi + prep (person) → approfittare di

impose

(imˈpouz) verb
1. to place (a tax, fine, task etc) on someone or something. The government have imposed a new tax on cigarettes.
2. to force (oneself, one's opinions etc) on a person. The headmaster liked to impose his authority on the teachers.
3. (often with on) to ask someone to do something which he should not be asked to do or which he will find difficult to do. I hope I'm not imposing (on you) by asking you to help.
imposition (impəˈziʃən) noun

impose

v. imponer.
References in classic literature ?
This gaiety did not impose upon anybody, but they tried to look as if it did for his sake, and he got on very well till Mrs.
But he was so soft-hearted that anyone could impose upon him.
But he failed to impose upon the Colonel, and was even far from impressing him with this trumped-up knowledge of bygone days.
Mindful, however, of her own errors and misfortunes, she early sought to impose a tender but strict control over the infant immortality that was committed to her charge.
He would not allow the older boys to impose upon me, and would divide his cakes with me.
Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
All this," thought Elinor, "is very pretty; but it can impose upon neither of us.
I mention this in your hearing, Jane, that you may not attempt to impose on Mr.
This was especially to be remarked if any one attempted to impose upon, or domineer over, his favourite: he was painfully jealous lest a word should be spoken amiss to him; seeming to have got into his head the notion that, because he liked Heathcliff, all hated, and longed to do him an ill-turn.
Considering that you are young, and striving for a place in life, I think it would be well to say that you would readily abide by any conditions they might impose upon you.
Then fetching from a cupboard a stoup of wine and two flagons, she placed them on the table, and said in a tone rather asserting a fact than asking a question, ``Thou art Saxon, father Deny it not,'' she continued, observing that Cedric hastened not to reply; ``the sounds of my native language are sweet to mine ears, though seldom heard save from the tongues of the wretched and degraded serfs on whom the proud Normans impose the meanest drudgery of this dwelling.
I could heartily wish a law was enacted, that every traveller, before he were permitted to publish his voyages, should be obliged to make oath before the Lord High Chancellor, that all he intended to print was absolutely true to the best of his knowledge; for then the world would no longer be deceived, as it usually is, while some writers, to make their works pass the better upon the public, impose the grossest falsities on the unwary reader.