impost


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

im·post 1

 (ĭm′pōst′)
n.
1. Something, such as a tax or duty, that is imposed.
2. Sports The weight a horse must carry in a handicap race.

[Obsolete French, from Old French, from Medieval Latin impostum, from Latin, neuter of impostus, variant of impositus, past participle of impōnere, to place upon; see impose.]

im·post 2

 (ĭm′pōst′)
n.
The uppermost part of a column or pillar supporting an arch.

[French imposte, from Italian imposta, from Latin, feminine past participle of impōnere, to place upon; see impose.]

impost

(ˈɪmpəʊst)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a tax, esp a customs duty
2. (Horse Racing) horse racing the specific weight that a particular horse must carry in a handicap race
vb
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (tr) US to classify (imported goods) according to the duty payable on them
[C16: from Medieval Latin impostus tax, from Latin impositus imposed; see impose]
ˈimposter n

impost

(ˈɪmpəʊst)
n
(Architecture) architect a member at the top of a wall, pier, or column that supports an arch, esp one that has a projecting moulding
[C17: from French imposte, from Latin impositus placed upon; see impose]

im•post1

(ˈɪm poʊst)

n.
1. a tax; duty; levy.
2. the weight assigned to a horse in a race.
[1560–70; < Medieval Latin impostus a tax, variant of impositus, past participle of impōnere to impose]
im′post•er, n.

im•post2

(ˈɪm poʊst)

n.
1. the point of springing of an arch; spring.
2. an architectural feature immediately beneath this point.
[1655–65; < French imposte < Italian imposta < Latin: feminine of impostus (past participle): see impost1]

impost


Past participle: imposted
Gerund: imposting

Imperative
impost
impost
Present
I impost
you impost
he/she/it imposts
we impost
you impost
they impost
Preterite
I imposted
you imposted
he/she/it imposted
we imposted
you imposted
they imposted
Present Continuous
I am imposting
you are imposting
he/she/it is imposting
we are imposting
you are imposting
they are imposting
Present Perfect
I have imposted
you have imposted
he/she/it has imposted
we have imposted
you have imposted
they have imposted
Past Continuous
I was imposting
you were imposting
he/she/it was imposting
we were imposting
you were imposting
they were imposting
Past Perfect
I had imposted
you had imposted
he/she/it had imposted
we had imposted
you had imposted
they had imposted
Future
I will impost
you will impost
he/she/it will impost
we will impost
you will impost
they will impost
Future Perfect
I will have imposted
you will have imposted
he/she/it will have imposted
we will have imposted
you will have imposted
they will have imposted
Future Continuous
I will be imposting
you will be imposting
he/she/it will be imposting
we will be imposting
you will be imposting
they will be imposting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been imposting
you have been imposting
he/she/it has been imposting
we have been imposting
you have been imposting
they have been imposting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been imposting
you will have been imposting
he/she/it will have been imposting
we will have been imposting
you will have been imposting
they will have been imposting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been imposting
you had been imposting
he/she/it had been imposting
we had been imposting
you had been imposting
they had been imposting
Conditional
I would impost
you would impost
he/she/it would impost
we would impost
you would impost
they would impost
Past Conditional
I would have imposted
you would have imposted
he/she/it would have imposted
we would have imposted
you would have imposted
they would have imposted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impost - money collected under a tariff
tariff, duty - a government tax on imports or exports; "they signed a treaty to lower duties on trade between their countries"
ship money - an impost levied in England to provide money for ships for national defense
2.impost - the lowest stone in an arch -- from which it springs
arch - (architecture) a masonry construction (usually curved) for spanning an opening and supporting the weight above it
stone - building material consisting of a piece of rock hewn in a definite shape for a special purpose; "he wanted a special stone to mark the site"

impost

noun
1. A compulsory contribution, usually of money, that is required for the support of a government:
2. Sports. Something carried physically:
Translations

impost

[ˈɪmpəʊst] Nimpuesto m
References in classic literature ?
The Custom-House marker imprinted it, with a stencil and black paint, on pepper-bags, and baskets of anatto, and cigar-boxes, and bales of all kinds of dutiable merchandise, in testimony that these commodities had paid the impost, and gone regularly through the office.
One morning, I will suppose, some one enters my shop, and says to me: 'Father Coppenole, there is this and there is that, the Demoiselle of Flanders wishes to save her ministers, the grand bailiff is doubling the impost on shagreen, or something else,'--what you will.
In my day, in my own country, this money was collected from imposts, and the citizen imagined that the foreign importer paid it, and it made him comfortable to think so; whereas, in fact, it was paid by the American people, and was so equally and exactly distributed among them that the annual cost to the 100-millionaire and the annual cost to the sucking child of the day-laborer was pre- cisely the same -- each paid $6.
It is in vain I represent that, before the sequestration of emigrant property, I had remitted the imposts they had ceased to pay; that I had collected no rent; that I had had recourse to no process.
In so opulent a nation as that of Britain, where direct taxes from superior wealth must be much more tolerable, and, from the vigor of the government, much more practicable, than in America, far the greatest part of the national revenue is derived from taxes of the indirect kind, from imposts, and from excises.
It has been urged and echoed, that the power "to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises, to pay the debts, and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States," amounts to an unlimited commission to exercise every power which may be alleged to be necessary for the common defense or general welfare.
He agreed that we knew something in that way, but inquired how I should have gone to work in getting up the imposts on the lintels of even the little palace at Carnac.
The Congress shall have Power to lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;
No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or Duties on Imports or Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing it's inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of the Treasury of the United States; and all such Laws shall be subject to the Revision and Controul of the Congress.
Taxes and imposts upon them, do seldom good to the king's revenue; for that that he wins in the hundred, he leeseth in the shire; the particular rates being increased, but the total bulk of trading, rather decreased.
The States will say that the imposts are too heavy, and that the surintendant has ruined them.
It also called countries to impost an embargo for sending weapons to Syrian government forces as well as armed opposition groups implicated in committing war crimes.