impostor


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im·pos·tor

or im·pos·ter  (ĭm-pŏs′tər)
n.
One who engages in deception under an assumed name or identity.

[French imposteur, from Latin impostor, one who assigns a name, from impostus, variant of impositus, past participle of impōnere, to place upon; see impose.]

impostor

(ɪmˈpɒstə) or

imposter

n
a person who deceives others, esp by assuming a false identity; charlatan
[C16: from Late Latin: deceiver; see impose]

im•pos•tor

or im•post•er

(ɪmˈpɒs tər)

n.
a person who practices deception under an assumed character, identity, or name.
[1580–90; < Late Latin, = Latin impos(i)-, variant s. of impōnere to deceive, place on, impose]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impostor - a person who makes deceitful pretensesimpostor - a person who makes deceitful pretenses
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
name dropper - someone who pretends that famous people are his/her friends
ringer - a contestant entered in a competition under false pretenses

impostor

noun fraud, cheat, fake, impersonator, rogue, deceiver, sham, pretender, hypocrite, charlatan, quack, trickster, knave (archaic), phoney or phony (informal) He was an imposter who masqueraded as a doctor.

impostor

noun
Translations
دَجّال، مُحْتال
podvodník
bedragersvindler
svikari, svindlari
blēdiskrāpnieks
dolandırıcısahtekâr kimse

impostor

[ɪmˈpɒstər] nimposteur m

impostor

nBetrüger(in) m(f), → Schwindler(in) m(f); (assuming higher position also) → Hochstapler(in) m(f)

impostor

[ɪmˈpɒstəʳ] nimpostore/a

impostor

(imˈpostə) noun
a person who pretends to be someone else, or to be something he is not, in order to deceive another person.
References in classic literature ?
The Emperor came himself with his most distinguished knights, and each impostor held up his arm just as if he were holding something, and said, 'See
I am not a hero to you now, as I tried to seem before, but simply a nasty person, an impostor.
And now, you damned impostor, you'd better tell me who you are.
The hero took fire at this proposal, and answered with the highest indignation that nothing should make him forsake his heavenly Master to follow an impostor, and continued in the severest terms to vilify their false prophet, till Mahomet struck off his head.
She told a tiresome story about her having been robbed of her papers and her name by an impostor who had personated her.
If I was a shilling a week less useful in ten years' time, this impostor would give me a shilling a week less; if as useful a man could be got at sixpence cheaper, he would be taken in my place at sixpence cheaper.
The ruffianly side of him must have been uppermost, I suppose, when he got my letter, for he wrote back, refusing me in such abominably insolent language, that I lost all command over myself, and abused him, in my daughter's presence, as "a low impostor whom I could ruin for life if I chose to open my lips and let out his Secret.
You did not gradually open your round childish eyes wider and wider to the discovery of that impostor of a woman who calculates her stores of peace of mind for when she wakes up in the night.
The impostors requested him very courteously to be so good as to come nearer their looms; and then asked him whether the design pleased him, and whether the colors were not very beautiful; at the same time pointing to the empty frames.
We procured the services of a gentleman experienced in the nomenclature of the American bar, and moved upon the works of one of these impostors.
Although any man who had proved his unfitness for any other occupation in life, was free, without examination or qualification, to open a school anywhere; although preparation for the functions he undertook, was required in the surgeon who assisted to bring a boy into the world, or might one day assist, perhaps, to send him out of it; in the chemist, the attorney, the butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker; the whole round of crafts and trades, the schoolmaster excepted; and although schoolmasters, as a race, were the blockheads and impostors who might naturally be expected to spring from such a state of things, and to flourish in it; these Yorkshire schoolmasters were the lowest and most rotten round in the whole ladder.
A taunting roar comes from the sea, and the far-out rollers mount upon one another, to look at the entrapped impostors, and to join in impish and exultant gambols.