imprecise


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im·pre·cise

 (ĭm′prĭ-sīs′)
adj.
Not precise.

im′pre·cise′ly adv.
im′pre·ci′sion (-sĭzh′ən) n.

imprecise

(ˌɪmprɪˈsaɪs)
adj
not precise; inexact or inaccurate
ˌimpreˈcisely adv
imprecision, ˌimpreˈciseness n

im•pre•cise

(ˌɪm prəˈsaɪs)

adj.
not precise; vague; inexact.
[1795–1805]
im`pre•cise′ly, adv.
im`pre•ci′sion (-ˈsɪʒ ən) im`pre•cise′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imprecise - not precise; "imprecise astronomical observations"; "the terms he used were imprecise and emotional"
inaccurate - not exact; "an inaccurate translation"; "the thermometer is inaccurate"
inexact - not exact
general - applying to all or most members of a category or group; "the general public"; "general assistance"; "a general rule"; "in general terms"; "comprehensible to the general reader"
precise - sharply exact or accurate or delimited; "a precise mind"; "specified a precise amount"; "arrived at the precise moment"

imprecise

Translations
غَيْر دَقيق
nepřesný
upræcis
nem pontos
ónákvæmur
netikslumasnetikslus
neprecīzsneskaidrs
açık olmayanbelirsiz

imprecise

[ˌɪmprɪˈsaɪs] ADJ [information, definition] → impreciso

imprecise

[ˌɪmprɪˈsaɪs] adjimprécis(e)

imprecise

adj, imprecisely
advungenau, unpräzis(e)

imprecise

[ˌɪmprɪˈsaɪs] adjimpreciso/a

imprecise

(impriˈsais) adjective
not clear; vague. Her directions were so imprecise that we lost our way.
ˌimpreˈcision noun
References in periodicals archive ?
The imprecise coverage and biased interpretation of Younesi's statements have taken place with the purpose of downplaying the great victories of the Iraqi people," Afkham said on Saturday.
MY trade is a fairly imprecise art in some respects.
MCPS-style "statistics and probability" does not teach the basics of how to make reliable statistical inferences from imprecise data.
Orozco said she looked to add hours to "creative time," such as time spent brainstorming press releases or media plans where the time was "most easily imprecise.
That number is imprecise because many miscarriages occur within days of conception, before a woman knows that she is pregnant.
The broad, daunting facade of the photographed building mimics the stout, imposing three-dimensional work, while the statue provides context: It is Moscow, or, better, because of the work's imprecise details, a memory of Moscow.
Consequently, there has been little rigorous analysis or scholarly debate about the topic in academic social work circles and today many social workers use the term in an imprecise and even rhetorical way.
The more top-tier regulatory commands strive for predictive capability, the more imprecise the management of micro-cap commercial activity, due to transactional transference to economic externalities.
Add that the reports of Gnostic thought by "orthodox" early Christian writers such as Irenaeus differ from what one learns from these texts, and she concludes that the term Gnosticism is so imprecise as to be useless.
He gives 7 April as the date for the Annunciation (25 March) (105), without explaining that the Orthodox calendar is fourteen days behind the western calendar, and provides imprecise names for the sacraments and a faulty explanation of the Eucharist (158-59).
The model of the Gericke House, on the other hand, reveals a masterpiece which I had not appreciated from the imprecise sketches published in the books.
Not long after the World Trade Organization protests in Seattle in 1999, I got into an argument with a friend about "globalization," that vast, imprecise abstraction that has become one of