imprecise

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im·pre·cise

 (ĭm′prĭ-sīs′)
adj.
Not precise.

im′pre·cise′ly adv.
im′pre·ci′sion (-sĭzh′ən) n.

imprecise

(ˌɪmprɪˈsaɪs)
adj
not precise; inexact or inaccurate
ˌimpreˈcisely adv
imprecision, ˌimpreˈciseness n

im•pre•cise

(ˌɪm prəˈsaɪs)

adj.
not precise; vague; inexact.
[1795–1805]
im`pre•cise′ly, adv.
im`pre•ci′sion (-ˈsɪʒ ən) im`pre•cise′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imprecise - not precise; "imprecise astronomical observations"; "the terms he used were imprecise and emotional"
inaccurate - not exact; "an inaccurate translation"; "the thermometer is inaccurate"
inexact - not exact
general - applying to all or most members of a category or group; "the general public"; "general assistance"; "a general rule"; "in general terms"; "comprehensible to the general reader"
precise - sharply exact or accurate or delimited; "a precise mind"; "specified a precise amount"; "arrived at the precise moment"

imprecise

Translations
غَيْر دَقيق
nepřesný
upræcis
nem pontos
ónákvæmur
netikslumasnetikslus
neprecīzsneskaidrs
açık olmayanbelirsiz

imprecise

[ˌɪmprɪˈsaɪs] ADJ [information, definition] → impreciso

imprecise

[ˌɪmprɪˈsaɪs] adjimprécis(e)

imprecise

adj, imprecisely
advungenau, unpräzis(e)

imprecise

[ˌɪmprɪˈsaɪs] adjimpreciso/a

imprecise

(impriˈsais) adjective
not clear; vague. Her directions were so imprecise that we lost our way.
ˌimpreˈcision noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Changing the imprecisions at low concentrations (<100 mg/dL) from a proportion of the measured value (CV) to a fixed concentration (fixed at the SD equivalent to the CV% at a glucose concentration of 100 mg/dL) produced no evident effect on glycemic control in the modeled patients (not shown).
This effect was seen at measurement imprecisions (CVs) of 5% to 20% and was seen with each of the 2 treatment regimens tested.
Although it continues a line of approach that arguably offers today's readers and viewers few rewards, there are imprecisions throughout this well-produced book, beginning with its very title.
Briefly, for each of 800 sets of bias and imprecision conditions that spanned biases between -20% and 20%, and imprecisions between 0% and 20%, we produced 20 000 simulated glucose values by use of random sampling with replacement of the 29 920 initial glucose values, following the equation
65 X imprecision (CV%)], TEa lines are superimposed on each graph to demonstrate the percentage of insulin dosing errors that occur for the 10%, 15%, and 20% TEa conditions.
When the rates of false-positive changes observed with serial samples were examined, the results were slightly different for 10% vs 25% assay imprecisions, being, respectively, 13 and 15 false positives per thousand for 2 samples, and 14 and 20 per thousand for 3 samples.
We believe assays with imprecision up to a 20% CV may reasonably be used for diagnosis and/or risk stratification, This belief is based on the following arguments:
For each measurement procedure, day-to-day imprecisions were estimated simultaneously with Unassayed Chemistry Control 1 and Unassayed Chemistry Control 2 (unassayed reference materials 731 and 732, respectively; Bio-Rad) as control materials and two serum pools from routine patient samples having values near the values obtained in the control materials.
To determine the interchangeability of the day-to-day imprecisions determined for the two types of materials, each pair of variances (corresponding to results obtained with the control material and the serum pool having similar values) was compared by the F-test.
Such requirements can be one of the fractiles of the distribution of imprecisions from all participating laboratories in different external quality assessment schemes, provided that in these schemes imprecision is estimated from all of the results corresponding to a particular control material.
Various models have been proposed to set requirements for imprecision in clinical laboratory sciences.
In the first case, the acceptance limits are defined by the inherent analytical imprecisions, and in the latter case the acceptance limits are defined by the analytical quality specifications.