imprisonment


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im·pris·on

 (ĭm-prĭz′ən)
tr.v. im·pris·oned, im·pris·on·ing, im·pris·ons
To put in or as if in prison; confine.

[Middle English emprisonen, from Old French emprisoner : en-, in (from Latin in-; see in-2) + prison, prison; see prison.]

im·pris′on·a·ble adj.
im·pris′on·ment n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.imprisonment - putting someone in prison or in jail as lawful punishmentimprisonment - putting someone in prison or in jail as lawful punishment
penalisation, penalization, penalty, punishment - the act of punishing
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.imprisonment - the state of being imprisonedimprisonment - the state of being imprisoned; "he was held in captivity until he died"; "the imprisonment of captured soldiers"; "his ignominious incarceration in the local jail"; "he practiced the immurement of his enemies in the castle dungeon"
confinement - the state of being confined; "he was held in confinement"
durance - imprisonment (especially for a long time)
life imprisonment - a sentence of imprisonment until death
internment - confinement during wartime
3.imprisonment - the act of confining someone in a prison (or as if in a prison)
confinement - the act of restraining of a person's liberty by confining them
lockdown - the act of confining prisoners to their cells (usually to regain control during a riot)
false imprisonment - (law) confinement without legal authority
custody - holding by the police; "the suspect is in custody"

imprisonment

noun confinement, custody, detention, captivity, incarceration, internment, duress She was sentenced to seven years' imprisonment.
Translations
سَجْن
uvěznění
fængslingfangenskab
bebörtönzés
fangelsun; fangelsisvist
zapor
hapishapsetme

imprisonment

[ɪmˈprɪznmənt] N (= act) → encarcelamiento m; (= term of imprisonment) → cárcel f, prisión f
he was sentenced to ten years imprisonmentfue condenado a diez años de prisión
imprisonment without trialdetención f sin procesamiento
life imprisonmentcadena f perpetua

imprisonment

[ɪmˈprɪzənmənt] n (= time in prison) → emprisonnement m
during his imprisonment → pendant son emprisonnement
He was given ten years' imprisonment → Il fut condamné à dix ans d'emprisonnement.

imprisonment

n (= action)Einsperren nt (inf), → Inhaftierung f; (= state)Gefangenschaft f; the prospect of imprisonmentdie Aussicht auf eine Freiheitsstrafe; to sentence somebody to one month’s/life imprisonmentjdn zu einem Monat Gefängnis or Freiheitsstrafe/zu lebenslänglicher Freiheitsstrafe verurteilen; to serve a term of imprisonmenteine Freiheitsstrafe verbüßen

imprisonment

[ɪmˈprɪznmənt] nreclusione f
during his imprisonment → mentre era in carcere
life imprisonment → l'ergastolo

imprison

(imˈprizn) verb
to put in prison; to take or keep prisoner. He was imprisoned for twenty years for his crimes.
imˈprisonment noun
References in classic literature ?
The young man was tried and convicted of the crime; but either the circumstantial nature of the evidence, and possibly some lurking doubts in the breast of the executive, or" lastly--an argument of greater weight in a republic than it could have been under a monarchy,--the high respectability and political influence of the criminal's connections, had availed to mitigate his doom from death to perpetual imprisonment.
A landsman could hardly have worn this garb and shown this face, and worn and shown them both with such a galliard air, without undergoing stern question before a magistrate, and probably incurring a fine or imprisonment, or perhaps an exhibition in the stocks.
If these words had been spoken by some easy, self-indulgent exhorter, from whose mouth they might have come merely as pious and rhetorical flourish, proper to be used to people in distress, perhaps they might not have had much effect; but coming from one who daily and calmly risked fine and imprisonment for the cause of God and man, they had a weight that could not but be felt, and both the poor, desolate fugitives found calmness and strength breathing into them from it.
I have contemplated the imprisonment of the offender, rather than the seizure of his goods--though both will serve the same purpose--because they who assert the purest right, and consequently are most dangerous to a corrupt State, commonly have not spent much time in accumulating property.
Hear and obey: --You will immediately remove every trace of your offensive work from the Schiller monument; you pay a fine of ten thousand francs; you will suffer two years' imprisonment at hard labor; you will then be horsewhipped, tarred and feathered, deprived of your ears, ridden on a rail to the confines of the canton, and banished forever.
The false heir made a full confession and was sentenced to imprisonment for life.
Her lovely light brown hair looked thicker and softer than ever, now that it had escaped from its imprisonment under the gray wig.
Has it been your misfortune to undergo a long imprisonment, without trial, or even accusation, in your native country, Doctor Manette?
I did so, and did so every morning of my imprisonment, which lasted five days.
That swindling Pumblechook, exalted into the beneficent contriver of the whole occasion, actually took the top of the table; and, when he addressed them on the subject of my being bound, and had fiendishly congratulated them on my being liable to imprisonment if I played at cards, drank strong liquors, kept late hours or bad company, or indulged in other vagaries which the form of my indentures appeared to contemplate as next to inevitable, he placed me standing on a chair beside him, to illustrate his remarks.
Have not men, shut up in solitary imprisonment, found an interest in marking the moments by straight strokes of a certain length on the wall, until the growth of the sum of straight strokes, arranged in triangles, has become a mastering purpose?
Leaving the Saxon chiefs to return to their banquet as soon as their ungratified curiosity should permit them to attend to the calls of their half-satiated appetite, we have to look in upon the yet more severe imprisonment of Isaac of York.