improvisation

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im·prov·i·sa·tion

 (ĭm-prŏv′ĭ-zā′shən, ĭm′prə-vĭ-)
n.
1. The act or art of improvising.
2. Something improvised, such as a musical passage or comedic skit.

im·prov′i·sa′tion·al adj.
im·prov′i·sa′tion·al·ly adv.

improvisation

(ˌɪmprəvaɪˈzeɪʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of improvising
2. a product of improvising; something improvised
ˌimproviˈsational, improvisatory adj

im•prov•i•sa•tion

(ɪmˌprɒv əˈzeɪ ʃən, ˌɪm prə və-)

n.
1. an act of improvising.
2. something improvised.
[1780–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.improvisation - a creation spoken or written or composed extemporaneously (without prior preparation)
creation - an artifact that has been brought into existence by someone
2.improvisation - an unplanned expedient
expedient - a means to an end; not necessarily a principled or ethical one
3.improvisation - a performance given extempore without planning or preparation
performance - the act of presenting a play or a piece of music or other entertainment; "we congratulated him on his performance at the rehearsal"; "an inspired performance of Mozart's C minor concerto"

improvisation

noun
1. invention, spontaneity, ad-libbing, extemporizing Funds were not abundant, and clever improvisation was necessary.
2. ad-lib an improvisation on 'Jingle Bells'

improvisation

noun
Something improvised:
Translations
إرْتِجال، إسْتِنْباط على الفَوْر
improvizace
improvisering
rögtönzés
spuni
improvizácia

improvisation

[ˌɪmprəvaɪˈzeɪʃən] N (= act) → improvisación f; (= improvised speech, music) → improvisación f

improvisation

[ˌɪmprəvaɪˈzeɪʃən] nimprovisation f

improvisation

nImprovisation f, → Improvisierung f; (object improvised) → Provisorium nt

improvisation

[ˌɪmprəvaɪˈzeɪʃn] nimprovvisazione f

improvise

(ˈimprəvaiz) verb
1. to compose and perform (a poem, tune etc) without preparation. The pianist forgot his music and had to improvise.
2. to make (something) from materials that happen to be available, often materials that are not normally used for that purpose. They improvised a shelter from branches and blankets.
ˌimproviˈsation noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Synopsis: "The Implacable Absence: A Non-Idiomatic Improvisational Duet" is a post-existential fantasy in which a mushroom man, a talking bug and a doppelganger traverse Faerie, Nirvana, and other planes of existence in search of the Deadly Galerina, an ambiguous deity from the Kingdom of Fungi.
com)-- StoneKap, a new media video production company has issued a call to area teens ages 14 to 18 interested in the art of Improvisational Performance to attend one of two free workshops being held at Stark State College on June 12th and Akron General Health and Wellness Center June 19th.
Improvisational Theater, often called improv, is a form of theater where most or all of what is performed is created at the moment it is performed.
Keith Johnstone was one of the original masters of improvisational technique, and author Dudeck (acting, Chapman U.
Summary: Muscat: Alive Entertainment announced yesterday that award-winning improvisational comedy show Whose Line Is It Anyway?
THE IMPROVISATIONAL COOK offers a fine survey that takes the home cook a step away from relying on recipes and cookbooks, and teaches how to develop successful improvisational strategies.
But improvisational comedy programmes have been few and far between since.
Titles like "World Piece," "Caribbean Dance," "Paris 1890," "So Much Wealth, So Little Cash," evoke the improvisational material introduced in the section.
Specific goals of the study were to: (1) determine the durations, start and stop times, and rhythmic patterns of improvised responses to a simple given call using drums; (2) determine the presence or absence of steady beat in improvised responses; and (3) describe the social factors that may affect the improvisational choices of young children.
The eight-year-old, who is the grandson of well-known Nicosia dance teacher and choreographer Mikis Shakallis, got through to this Friday's finals on the Ant1 show after impressing the public with his version of the Greek folk improvisational dance.
It would come as no surprise to the late saxophonist and improvisational master John Coltrane, but when accomplished jazz musicians play free-form, their brain activity suggests a release of self-expression from conscious monitoring and self-censorship.
The Comedy Studies Program, which begins in January, will give 16 students the chance to study and work with members of the famous Second City improvisational troupe in Chicago, which helped launch numerous comedy careers, including those of Robert Klein, Joan Rivers, Bill Murray, Amy Sedaris, and Steve Carrell.