imprudent

(redirected from imprudences)
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im·pru·dent

 (ĭm-pro͞od′nt)
adj.
Unwise or indiscreet; not prudent.

im·pru′dent·ly adv.

imprudent

(ɪmˈpruːdənt)
adj
not prudent; rash, heedless, or indiscreet
imˈprudence n
imˈprudently adv

im•pru•dent

(ɪmˈprud nt)

adj.
not prudent; lacking discretion; rash: an imprudent remark.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
im•pru′dence n.
im•pru′dent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.imprudent - not prudent or wise; "very imprudent of her mother to encourage her in such silly romantic ideas"; "would be imprudent for a noneconomist to talk about the details of economic policy"- A.M.Schlesinger
careless - marked by lack of attention or consideration or forethought or thoroughness; not careful; "careless about her clothes"; "forgotten by some careless person"; "a careless housekeeper"; "careless proofreading"; "it was a careless mistake"; "hurt by a careless remark"
improvident - not provident; not providing for the future
foolish - devoid of good sense or judgment; "foolish remarks"; "a foolish decision"
prudent - careful and sensible; marked by sound judgment; "a prudent manager"; "prudent rulers"; "prudent hesitation"; "more prudent to hide than to fight"
2.imprudent - lacking wise self-restraint; "an imprudent remark"
indiscreet - lacking discretion; injudicious; "her behavior was indiscreet at the very best"

imprudent

imprudent

adjective
Translations
عديم الفِطْنَه، غَيْر مُتَرَوٍّ
nerozumný
ubetænksomuklog
óskynsamur
neprotingaineprotingasneprotingumas
neapdomīgspārsteidzīgs
tedbirsiz

imprudent

[ɪmˈpruːdənt] ADJimprudente

imprudent

[ɪmˈpruːdənt] adjimprudent(e)
It would be imprudent of you to insult him → Il serait imprudent de ta part de l'insulter.

imprudent

adj, imprudently
advunklug

imprudent

[ɪmˈpruːdnt] adjimprudente

imprudent

(imˈpruːdənt) adjective
not having or showing good sense; unwise.
imˈprudently adverb
imˈprudence noun
References in classic literature ?
He called out to a passing traveler for help, but instead of holding out a helping hand, the man stood by unconcernedly, and scolded the boy for his imprudence.
If that is called imprudence, I wonder what would be called a thoughtful provision against the vicissitudes of fortune.
One day he had the imprudence to recall himself to the memory of the cardinal.