impulsion


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im·pul·sion

 (ĭm-pŭl′shən)
n.
1. The act of impelling or the condition of being impelled: "I do not move ... unless it be under the impulsion of a third party" (Samuel Beckett).
2. An impelling force; a thrust.
3. Motion produced by an impelling force; momentum.
4. A wish or urge from within; an impulse.

impulsion

(ɪmˈpʌlʃən)
n
1. the act of impelling or the state of being impelled
2. motion produced by an impulse; propulsion
3. a driving force; compulsion

im•pul•sion

(ɪmˈpʌl ʃən)

n.
1. the act of impelling.
2. the resulting state or effect.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impulsion - a force that moves something alongimpulsion - a force that moves something along  
force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"
2.impulsion - the act of applying force suddenly; "the impulse knocked him over"
drive, driving force, thrust - the act of applying force to propel something; "after reaching the desired velocity the drive is cut off"
Translations

impulsion

[ɪmˈpʌlʃən] Nimpulsión f

impulsion

n (lit: = act of impelling) → Antrieb m; (lit, fig: = driving force also) → Antriebskraft f; (fig) (= impetus)Impuls m; (= compulsion)Trieb m, → Drang m

impulsion

[ɪmˈpʌlʃn] nimpulso
References in classic literature ?
At length I was clear of my dangerous neighbour, and just as I gave the last impulsion, my hands came across a light cord that was trailing overboard across the stern bulwarks.
By its own power of impulsion our apparatus made a canal for itself; some times carried away by its own impetus, it lodged on the ice-field, crushing it with its weight, and sometimes buried beneath it, dividing it by a simple pitching movement, producing large rents in it.
Every one, from the highest to the lowest degree, has his place on the social ladder, and is beset by stormy passions and conflicting interests, as in Descartes' theory of pressure and impulsion.
He had discovered, besides, since his departure from Chateaubriand, that nothing would be impossible for Furet under the impulsion of M.
It is acted upon by three independent forces: the resistance of the air, the attraction of the earth, and the force of impulsion with which it is endowed.
True," replied the president; "but we will overcome that, for the force of impulsion will depend on the length of the engine and the powder employed, the latter being limited only by the resisting power of the former.
The interests of this school are in general philosophy and the philosophy of the sciences, rather than in psychology; they have derived a strong impulsion from James, but have more interest than he had in logic and mathematics and the abstract part of philosophy.
He felt her firmness and obeyed the impulsion at once, just as the other two men had, a moment before, obeyed unquestioningly the wave of her hand.
At this time of their watch, the water close to them would be often agitated by some impulsion given it from a distance.
Le ministre, qui s'adressait aux visiteurs du SMAP expo de Bruxelles, a en outre indique que les artistes issus de l'immigration marocaine en Belgique ont fait montre d'une grande capacite de creation, contribuant ainsi a l'enrichissement de la scene culturelle belge, ajoutant qu'il est important que les artistes marocains et ceux issus de l'immigration marocaine se reunissent et travaillent ensemble pour donner une nouvelle impulsion a la dynamique culturelle et artistique que connaissent les deux Royaumes.
Djukanovic des moyens de donner une forte impulsion a la cooperation bilaterale entre les deux pays.
beaucoup moins que] Les parties prenant part au dialogue en cours a Alger le sont dans le cadre d'un dialogue entre freres et non d'une confrontation entre adversaires [beaucoup plus grand que], dit-il, promettant de [beaucoup moins que] donner une impulsion [beaucoup plus grand que] a ce dialogue [beaucoup moins que] si des difficultes surviennent [beaucoup plus grand que].