Imputability


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Related to Imputability: imperturbability

Im`put`a`bil´i`ty


n.1.The quality of being imputable; imputableness.
References in periodicals archive ?
The imputability of this diagnosis could not be clearly established because only 1 set of blood cultures had positive results.
81, 121 (2006) (quoting Luigi Condorelli, The Imputability to States of Acts of International Terrorism, 19 Isr.
1864); and that Gury himself operated through dialogue between two principles, imputability and justification.
Wood expands the idea of 'owning' outcomes through his subtle discussion of imputability.
28) "These six principles, which are in the nature of axioms, appear to cover all exemptions from criminal liability allowed in respect of conduct amounting outwardly to an infraction of the law": D A Stroud, Mens Rea, or Imputability under the Law of England (1914) p 23.
102) The Appeals Chamber, however, suggested that the indicia for both questions might be the same, as the core question was establishing "legal imputability to a state of acts performed by individuals not having the status of state officials.
9) Scholars and critics have tried with relative success to shift the emphasis of legal analysis from mens rea to other aspects of criminal liability, such as imputability (including causation and moral involuntariness), so as to ensure some form of moral philosophical content within inquiries into culpability.
And though the prejudices of her husband and community, 'the rules' of apartheid law and practice, provide a context for her behaviour, she cannot evade imputability.
Essentially, this is because the latter is based upon another democratic culture, representative democracy, of which one of the major cornerstones is imputability, which is at the origin of the English term accountability.
Here we notice a trend of abandoning the need for state imputability in two different scenarios, namely cases where a state supports the activities of non-state actors and cases where a state is unable to prevent non-state actors from carrying out attacks.
Even the imputability of an act, and hence of the legal capacity as well, is only established in the freedom of the act.
Note, however, that the Loizidou court essentially collapsed the issue of imputability with the question of the scope of Turkey's jurisdiction within the meaning of Article 1 of the European Convention.