impute

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Related to imputations: Pertaining to

im·pute

 (ĭm-pyo͞ot′)
tr.v. im·put·ed, im·put·ing, im·putes
1. To relate (something, usually something bad) to a particular cause or source; place the fault or responsibility for: imputed the rocket failure to a faulty gasket; kindly imputed my clumsiness to inexperience. See Synonyms at attribute.
2. To assign as a characteristic; credit: the gracefulness so often imputed to cats.

[Middle English imputen, from Old French emputer, from Latin imputāre : in-, in; see in-2 + putāre, to settle an account; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

impute

(ɪmˈpjuːt)
vb (tr)
1. to attribute or ascribe (something dishonest or dishonourable, esp a criminal offence) to a person
2. to attribute to a source or cause: I impute your success to nepotism.
3. (Commerce) commerce to give (a notional value) to goods or services when the real value is unknown
[C14: from Latin imputāre, from im- + putāre to think, calculate]
ˌimpuˈtation n
imˈputative adj
imˈputatively adv
imˈputer n

im•pute

(ɪmˈpyut)

v.t. -put•ed, -put•ing.
1. to attribute or ascribe: The children imputed magical powers to the old woman.
2. to attribute or ascribe (something discreditable) to someone or something.
3. to attribute (righteousness, guilt, etc.) to a person or persons vicariously.
4. to charge (a person) with fault.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin imputāre=im- im-1 + putāre to assess, think; see putative]
im•put′a•ble, adj.
im•put′er, n.
syn: See attribute.

impute


Past participle: imputed
Gerund: imputing

Imperative
impute
impute
Present
I impute
you impute
he/she/it imputes
we impute
you impute
they impute
Preterite
I imputed
you imputed
he/she/it imputed
we imputed
you imputed
they imputed
Present Continuous
I am imputing
you are imputing
he/she/it is imputing
we are imputing
you are imputing
they are imputing
Present Perfect
I have imputed
you have imputed
he/she/it has imputed
we have imputed
you have imputed
they have imputed
Past Continuous
I was imputing
you were imputing
he/she/it was imputing
we were imputing
you were imputing
they were imputing
Past Perfect
I had imputed
you had imputed
he/she/it had imputed
we had imputed
you had imputed
they had imputed
Future
I will impute
you will impute
he/she/it will impute
we will impute
you will impute
they will impute
Future Perfect
I will have imputed
you will have imputed
he/she/it will have imputed
we will have imputed
you will have imputed
they will have imputed
Future Continuous
I will be imputing
you will be imputing
he/she/it will be imputing
we will be imputing
you will be imputing
they will be imputing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been imputing
you have been imputing
he/she/it has been imputing
we have been imputing
you have been imputing
they have been imputing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been imputing
you will have been imputing
he/she/it will have been imputing
we will have been imputing
you will have been imputing
they will have been imputing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been imputing
you had been imputing
he/she/it had been imputing
we had been imputing
you had been imputing
they had been imputing
Conditional
I would impute
you would impute
he/she/it would impute
we would impute
you would impute
they would impute
Past Conditional
I would have imputed
you would have imputed
he/she/it would have imputed
we would have imputed
you would have imputed
they would have imputed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.impute - attribute or credit toimpute - attribute or credit to; "We attributed this quotation to Shakespeare"; "People impute great cleverness to cats"
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"
impute - attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source; "The teacher imputed the student's failure to his nervousness"
carnalize, sensualize - ascribe to an origin in sensation
credit - give someone credit for something; "We credited her for saving our jobs"
reattribute - attribute to another source
anthropomorphise, anthropomorphize - ascribe human features to something
personate, personify - attribute human qualities to something; "The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous"
credit, accredit - ascribe an achievement to; "She was not properly credited in the program"
blame, charge - attribute responsibility to; "We blamed the accident on her"; "The tragedy was charged to her inexperience"
externalise, externalize, project - regard as objective
interiorise, interiorize, internalise, internalize - incorporate within oneself; make subjective or personal; "internalize a belief"
2.impute - attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source; "The teacher imputed the student's failure to his nervousness"
ascribe, attribute, impute, assign - attribute or credit to; "We attributed this quotation to Shakespeare"; "People impute great cleverness to cats"

impute

verb attribute, assign, ascribe, credit, refer, accredit It is unfair to impute blame to the employees.

impute

verb
1. To ascribe (a misdeed or an error, for example) to:
2. To regard as belonging to or resulting from another:
Translations

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] VT to impute sth to sbimputar or atribuir algo a algn

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] vt (= attribute) → imputer
to impute blame to sb → imputer la responsabilité à qn

impute

vtzuschreiben (to sb/sth jdm/einer Sache); to impute a crime to somebodyjdn eines Verbrechens bezichtigen

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] vt (frm) to impute (to) (change, development) → attribuire (a); (crime, blame) → imputare (a)
References in classic literature ?
I would allow my- self to suffer under the greatest imputations which evil-minded men might suggest, rather than excul- pate myself, and thereby run the hazard of closing the slightest avenue by which a brother slave might clear himself of the chains and fetters of slavery.
Andrew felt, what I felt, that if these imputations were not withdrawn before his generous intentions toward his brother took effect, the mere fact of their execution would amount to a practical acknowledgment of the justice of Michael's charge against him.
The just imputations on our own faith, in respect to the same treaty, ought first to be removed.
Distrust naturally creates distrust, and by nothing is good-will and kind conduct more speedily changed than by invidious jealousies and uncandid imputations, whether expressed or implied.
A greenish pallor spread over the count's cheeks, and his eyes became bloodshot at these terrible imputations, which were listened to by the assembly with ominous silence.
But he threw himself into a chair again directly, saying, more feebly, "You seem to forget that, in suspecting me, you are casting imputations upon her.
It was clear that Lydgate, by not dispensing drugs, intended to cast imputations on his equals, and also to obscure the limit between his own rank as a general practitioner and that of the physicians, who, in the interest of the profession, felt bound to maintain its various grades,-- especially against a man who had not been to either of the English universities and enjoyed the absence of anatomical and bedside study there, but came with a libellous pretension to experience in Edinburgh and Paris, where observation might be abundant indeed, but hardly sound.
Irritated as I was at their foolish mirth and vexatious imputations, the uneasiness did not continue long: when they had had their laugh out, they returned again to the captain and lieutenant; and, while they disputed and commented upon them, my indignation rapidly cooled; the cause of it was quickly forgotten, and I turned my thoughts into a pleasanter channel.
But I am bound to tell you, Miss Tulliver, that not only the experience of my whole life, but my observation within the last three days, makes me fear that there is hardly any evidence which will save you from the painful effect of false imputations.
Chafed by the silent imputation, and inwardly troubled by so unaccountable a circumstance, the chief advanced to the side of the bed, and, stooping, cast an incredulous look at the features, as if distrusting their reality.
She resents, for all the world like some high little personage, the imputation on her truthfulness and, as it were, her respectability.
Lionel then goes on to impute the shock to an earthquake, and seems to substantiate the imputation by stating that a great earthquake, somewhere about that time, did actually do great mischief along the spanish land.