impute

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im·pute

 (ĭm-pyo͞ot′)
tr.v. im·put·ed, im·put·ing, im·putes
1. To relate (something, usually something bad) to a particular cause or source; place the fault or responsibility for: imputed the rocket failure to a faulty gasket; kindly imputed my clumsiness to inexperience. See Synonyms at attribute.
2. To assign as a characteristic; credit: the gracefulness so often imputed to cats.

[Middle English imputen, from Old French emputer, from Latin imputāre : in-, in; see in-2 + putāre, to settle an account; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

impute

(ɪmˈpjuːt)
vb (tr)
1. to attribute or ascribe (something dishonest or dishonourable, esp a criminal offence) to a person
2. to attribute to a source or cause: I impute your success to nepotism.
3. (Commerce) commerce to give (a notional value) to goods or services when the real value is unknown
[C14: from Latin imputāre, from im- + putāre to think, calculate]
ˌimpuˈtation n
imˈputative adj
imˈputatively adv
imˈputer n

im•pute

(ɪmˈpyut)

v.t. -put•ed, -put•ing.
1. to attribute or ascribe: The children imputed magical powers to the old woman.
2. to attribute or ascribe (something discreditable) to someone or something.
3. to attribute (righteousness, guilt, etc.) to a person or persons vicariously.
4. to charge (a person) with fault.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin imputāre=im- im-1 + putāre to assess, think; see putative]
im•put′a•ble, adj.
im•put′er, n.
syn: See attribute.

impute


Past participle: imputed
Gerund: imputing

Imperative
impute
impute
Present
I impute
you impute
he/she/it imputes
we impute
you impute
they impute
Preterite
I imputed
you imputed
he/she/it imputed
we imputed
you imputed
they imputed
Present Continuous
I am imputing
you are imputing
he/she/it is imputing
we are imputing
you are imputing
they are imputing
Present Perfect
I have imputed
you have imputed
he/she/it has imputed
we have imputed
you have imputed
they have imputed
Past Continuous
I was imputing
you were imputing
he/she/it was imputing
we were imputing
you were imputing
they were imputing
Past Perfect
I had imputed
you had imputed
he/she/it had imputed
we had imputed
you had imputed
they had imputed
Future
I will impute
you will impute
he/she/it will impute
we will impute
you will impute
they will impute
Future Perfect
I will have imputed
you will have imputed
he/she/it will have imputed
we will have imputed
you will have imputed
they will have imputed
Future Continuous
I will be imputing
you will be imputing
he/she/it will be imputing
we will be imputing
you will be imputing
they will be imputing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been imputing
you have been imputing
he/she/it has been imputing
we have been imputing
you have been imputing
they have been imputing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been imputing
you will have been imputing
he/she/it will have been imputing
we will have been imputing
you will have been imputing
they will have been imputing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been imputing
you had been imputing
he/she/it had been imputing
we had been imputing
you had been imputing
they had been imputing
Conditional
I would impute
you would impute
he/she/it would impute
we would impute
you would impute
they would impute
Past Conditional
I would have imputed
you would have imputed
he/she/it would have imputed
we would have imputed
you would have imputed
they would have imputed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.impute - attribute or credit toimpute - attribute or credit to; "We attributed this quotation to Shakespeare"; "People impute great cleverness to cats"
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"
impute - attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source; "The teacher imputed the student's failure to his nervousness"
carnalize, sensualize - ascribe to an origin in sensation
credit - give someone credit for something; "We credited her for saving our jobs"
reattribute - attribute to another source
anthropomorphise, anthropomorphize - ascribe human features to something
personate, personify - attribute human qualities to something; "The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous"
credit, accredit - ascribe an achievement to; "She was not properly credited in the program"
blame, charge - attribute responsibility to; "We blamed the accident on her"; "The tragedy was charged to her inexperience"
externalise, externalize, project - regard as objective
interiorise, interiorize, internalise, internalize - incorporate within oneself; make subjective or personal; "internalize a belief"
2.impute - attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source; "The teacher imputed the student's failure to his nervousness"
ascribe, attribute, impute, assign - attribute or credit to; "We attributed this quotation to Shakespeare"; "People impute great cleverness to cats"

impute

verb attribute, assign, ascribe, credit, refer, accredit It is unfair to impute blame to the employees.

impute

verb
1. To ascribe (a misdeed or an error, for example) to:
2. To regard as belonging to or resulting from another:
Translations

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] VT to impute sth to sbimputar or atribuir algo a algn

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] vt (= attribute) → imputer
to impute blame to sb → imputer la responsabilité à qn

impute

vtzuschreiben (to sb/sth jdm/einer Sache); to impute a crime to somebodyjdn eines Verbrechens bezichtigen

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] vt (frm) to impute (to) (change, development) → attribuire (a); (crime, blame) → imputare (a)
References in classic literature ?
The sweetness, the beauty, the witchery of your younger daughter, Colonel Munro, might explain my motives without imputing to me this injustice.
We might say (without in the least imputing crime to a personage of his eminent respectability) that there was enough of splendid rubbish in his life to cover up and paralyze a more active and subtile conscience than the Judge was ever troubled with.
asked the abbe smilingly, imputing the deep abstraction in which his visitor was plunged to the excess of his awe and wonder.
In an hurried manner he immediately began an inquiry after her health, imputing his visit to a wish of hearing that she were better.
At first I accused him of perfidiously deserting me; but as I grew more composed, I upbraided myself for imputing so cowardly an action to him, and tranquillized myself with the belief that he had availed himself, of the opportunity to go round to Nukuheva, in order to make some arrangement by which I could be removed from the valley.
The former to take good times, when first to relate to a man an angry business; for the first impression is much; and the other is, to sever, as much as may be, the construction of the injury from the point of contempt; imputing it to misunderstanding, fear, passion, or what you will.
The very willingness with which she performed these duties, the cheerfulness with which she bore her reverses, and the kindness which withheld her from imputing the smallest blame to him, were all perverted by this ingenious self-tormentor into further aggravations of his sufferings.
Of course I was vexed at all this; but still it was less the disappointment to myself that annoyed me, than the disappointment in him, and the trouble I was at to frame excuses to my friends for having seen and observed so little, without imputing one particle of blame to my companion.
Not vapid, waterish amusements, but good strong stuff; dealing in round abuse and blackguard names; pulling off the roofs of private houses, as the Halting Devil did in Spain; pimping and pandering for all degrees of vicious taste, and gorging with coined lies the most voracious maw; imputing to every man in public life the coarsest and the vilest motives; scaring away from the stabbed and prostrate body-politic, every Samaritan of clear conscience and good deeds; and setting on, with yell and whistle and the clapping of foul hands, the vilest vermin and worst birds of prey.
This was a question more difficult of solution; but as knaves generally overreach themselves by imputing their own designs to others, the idea immediately presented itself that some circumstances of irritation between Quilp and the old man, arising out of their secret transactions and not unconnected perhaps with his sudden disappearance, now rendered the former desirous of revenging himself upon him by seeking to entrap the sole object of his love and anxiety into a connexion of which he knew he had a dread and hatred.
The statistical principles justifying imputing data have formal (Schaefer 1997; Little and Rubin 2002) and more casual (Allison 2001; Enders 2010) justification and programs for performing imputations and for analyzing imputed data appear in statistical software (for example, StataCorp, 2009).
For this reason (and others), the CE began imputing income in 2004, (2) but it did not go back to impute income in previous years.