in all


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Related to in all: Moderation in all things

all

 (ôl)
adj.
1. Being or representing the entire or total number, amount, or quantity: All the windows are open. Deal all the cards. See Synonyms at whole.
2. Constituting, being, or representing the total extent or the whole: all Christendom.
3. Being the utmost possible of: argued the case in all seriousness.
4. Every: got into all manner of trouble.
5. Any whatsoever: beyond all doubt.
6. Pennsylvania Consumed; used up; gone: The apples are all.
7. Informal Being more than one: Who all came to the party? See Note at y'all.
n.
The whole of one's fortune, resources, or energy; everything one has: The brave defenders gave their all.
pron.
1. The entire or total number, amount, or quantity; totality: All of us are sick. All that I have is yours.
2. Everyone; everything: justice for all.
adv.
1.
a. Wholly; completely: a room painted all white.
b. So much: I am all the better for that experience.
c. Used as an intensive: Then he got all mad and left.
2. Each; apiece: a score of five all.
Idioms:
all along
From the beginning; throughout: saw through the disguise all along.
all but
Nearly; almost: all but crying with relief.
all in
1. Tired; exhausted.
2. Games Staking all of one's chips, as in poker.
3. Putting all of one's available resources into an effort: The governor mounted a halfhearted campaign for the presidency but didn't go all in.
all in all
Everything being taken into account: All in all, the criticism seemed fair.
all of Informal
Not more than: a conversation that took all of five minutes.
all one
Of no difference; immaterial: Whether we go out or stay in, it's all one to me.
all over
1. Completely ended or finished: Their marriage is all over.
2. In every part; everywhere: The storm swept across the island and left damage all over.
3. Typical of the person or thing just mentioned: Making wisecracks like that—that's Jim all over.
4. Showing much romantic interest or being in close contact: He was all over her during the slow dance.
5. Persistently or harshly critical or scolding: The coach was all over me about missing practice.
all out
With all one's strength, ability, or resources.
all that Informal
To the degree expected.
all there
Mentally unimpaired or competent.
all told
With everything considered; in all: All told, we won 100 games.
and all
1. And other things of the same type: "The only thing they seemed to have in common was their cowboy gear, ten-gallon hats and all" (Edward Chen).
2. Being included: devoured the peanuts, shells and all.
at all
1. In any way: unable to walk at all.
2. To any extent; whatever: not at all sorry.
be all Informal
To say or utter. Used chiefly in verbal narration: He's all, "What did you do that for?"
in all
Considering everything; all together: In all, it rained for two hours. I bought four hats, in all.

[Middle English al, from Old English eall; see al- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: The construction all that is used informally in questions and negative sentences to mean "to the degree expected." In the late 1960s, the Usage Panel rejected its use, but evidently resistance to all that is crumbling. In our 1997 survey, 72 percent of the Panel found the construction acceptable in the sentence The movie is not all that interesting. · Sentences of the form All X's are not Y may be ambiguous. All of the departments did not file a report may mean that some departments did not file, or that none did. The first meaning can be expressed unambiguously by the sentence Not all of the departments filed a report. The second meaning can be more clearly phrased as None of the departments filed a report or All of the departments failed to file a report. The same problem can arise with other universal terms such as every in negated sentences, as in the ambiguous Every department did not file a report. See Usage Note at every.
Word History: In the late 17th and early 18th centuries, groups of immigrants from southwestern Germany, Alsace, and Switzerland settled in Pennsylvania. The groups spoke closely related dialects of German that eventually merged into a new, distinctly American variety of German that came to be known as Pennsylvania Dutch. (The word Dutch in this expression comes from Deitsch, the Pennsylvania German equivalent of Deutsch, the standard German word for "German." The spelling of the word as Dutch has undoubtedly been influenced by the English word Dutch. English Dutch comes from the Middle Dutch word Dūtsch, meaning "Dutch" or "German," that is the Dutch equivalent of the German word Deutsch.) Pennsylvania Dutch, which is still spoken in some communities in Pennsylvania today—notably by the Amish—has contributed a number of words to American English, including dunk, hex, smearcase, snollygoster, spritz, and perhaps snickerdoodle. The dialect has also left other traces in the grammar and usage of English in Pennsylvania. For instance, in German, the word alle, literally meaning "all," can be used idiomatically to mean "all gone, used up, at an end." The standard German sentence Der Kaffee ist alle (word for word, "The coffee is all") means "The coffee is all gone" or "The coffee has been used up," for example. Some Pennsylvanians, too, may say The coffee is all to mean "The coffee is all gone"—the use of the English word all to mean "all gone" reflects the influence of Pennsylvania Dutch and reminds us of the days when many Pennsylvanians were bilingual in English and Pennsylvania Dutch and would switch back and forth between them in their daily lives.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.in all - with everything included or countedin all - with everything included or counted; "altogether he earns close to a million dollars"
Translations
في المَجْموع، جُمْلَة
celkem
ialttilsammen
samanlagt
tam tamınatoplam olarak

all

(oːl) adjective, pronoun
1. the whole (of). He ate all the cake; He has spent all of his money.
2. every one (of a group) when taken together. They were all present; All men are equal.
adverb
1. entirely. all alone; dressed all in white.
2. (with the) much; even. Your low pay is all the more reason to find a new job; I feel all the better for a shower.
ˌall-ˈclear noun
(usually with the) a signal or formal statement that a time of danger etc is over. They sounded the all-clear after the air-raid.
ˈall-out adjective
using the greatest effort possible. an all-out attempt.
ˈall-round adjective
1. including or applying to every part, person, thing etc. an all-round pay rise.
2. good at all parts of a subject etc. an all-round sportsman.
ˌall-ˈrounder noun
a person who is good at many kinds of work, sport etc.
all-terrain vehicle (ˌoːl təˈrein ˈviːəkl) noun
(also ATV) a small vehicle, looking like a small tractor, that can travel fast on rough ground.
all along
the whole time (that something was happening). I knew the answer all along.
all at once
1. all at the same time. Don't eat those cakes all at once!
2. suddenly. All at once the light went out.
all in
with everything included. Is that the price all in?
all in all
considering everything. We haven't done badly, all in all.
all over
1. over the whole of (a person, thing etc). My car is dirty all over.
2. finished. The excitement's all over now.
3. everywhere. We've been looking all over for you!
all right
1. unhurt; not ill or in difficulties etc. You look ill. Are you all right?
2. an expression of agreement to do something. `Will you come?' `Oh, all right.'
in all
in total, when everything is added up. I spent three hours in all waiting for buses last week.

Write all right (not alright).
References in periodicals archive ?
However, these are in all likelihood not going to be "smart" systems, according to David Clubb, director of International Services at the University of Pittsburgh.
And so, in all likelihood, will the whole spectrum of border-security reforms--the entry/exit system, the tamper-resistant visas--that must eventually pass through the INS.
179) Moreover, in all the cases, there has been an unmistakable pattern of unethical behavior by government counsel and the FBI.