in order


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.in order - in a state of proper readiness or preparation or arrangement; "everything is in order for their arrival"
ready - completely prepared or in condition for immediate action or use or progress; "get ready"; "she is ready to resign"; "the bridge is ready to collapse"; "I am ready to work"; "ready for action"; "ready for use"; "the soup will be ready in a minute"; "ready to learn to read"
Translations
صَحيح، وِفْقا للقانونلِكَيمُرَتَّب، مُنَظَّم
i ordenklart
í lagi, tilbúinní samræmi viî reglur, í lagi
podľa poriadku
ayarlanmış durumdauygun

order

(ˈoːdə) noun
1. a statement (by a person in authority) of what someone must do; a command. He gave me my orders.
2. an instruction to supply something. orders from Germany for special gates.
3. something supplied. Your order is nearly ready.
4. a tidy state. The house is in (good) order.
5. a system or method. I must have order in my life.
6. an arrangement (of people, things etc) in space, time etc. in alphabetical order; in order of importance.
7. a peaceful condition. law and order.
8. a written instruction to pay money. a banker's order.
9. a group, class, rank or position. This is a list of the various orders of plants; the social order.
10. a religious society, especially of monks. the Benedictine order.
verb
1. to tell (someone) to do something (from a position of authority). He ordered me to stand up.
2. to give an instruction to supply. I have ordered some new furniture from the shop; He ordered a steak.
3. to put in order. Should we order these alphabetically?
ˈorderly adjective
well-behaved; quiet. an orderly queue of people.
nounplural ˈorderlies
1. a hospital attendant who does routine jobs.
2. a soldier who carries an officer's orders and messages.
ˈorderliness noun
ˈorder-form noun
a form on which a customer's order is written.
in order
1. correct according to what is regularly done, especially in meetings etc. It is quite in order to end the meeting now.
2. in a good efficient state. Everything is in order for the party.
in order (that)
so that. He checked all his figures again in order that the report might be as accurate as possible.
in order to
for the purpose of. I went home in order to change my clothes.
made to order
made when and how a customer wishes. curtains made to order.
on order
having been ordered but not yet supplied. We don't have any copies of this book at the moment, but it's on order.
order about
to keep on giving orders (to someone). I'm tired of him ordering me about all the time.
out of order
1. not working (properly). The machine is out of order.
2. not correct according to what is regularly done, especially in meetings etc. He was out of order in saying that.
a tall order
a difficult job or task. Asking us to finish this by Friday is a bit of a tall order.
References in classic literature ?
Besides Tom and his father, the Swift household was made up of Eradicate Sampson, a colored man-of-all-work, who, with his mule Boomerang, did what he could to keep the grounds around the house in order.
The lengthened sheet of the Champlain stretched from the frontiers of Canada, deep within the borders of the neighboring province of New York, forming a natural passage across half the distance that the French were compelled to master in order to strike their enemies.
FirstList will forward the contacts pertaining go the principals or intermediaries representing the businesses for sale in order to obtain additional information.
Prior Information Notice: The purpose of this pin notice is to review potential market solutions available in order to develop a robust open specification.
Such a move would allow the company to cash in on a hot brand in order to concentrate on its bingo parlor business and other leisure industry pursuits.
Now, in order to raid a workplace, agents have to essentially go all the way to Washington to ask permission, so it doesn't happen.
38) In another 1989 decision, the 11th Circuit held that the statutory catchall phrase "and other local conditions" did not include local conditions created by a local zoning ordinance, in view of the preceding restrictive term "climate," and therefore the Miami Heart Institute could not shorten the useful life of three facilities it replaced as a result of a zoning ordinance in order to recover unreimbursed costs from Medicare.