inalterability


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in·al·ter·a·ble

 (ĭn-ôl′tər-ə-bəl)
adj.
Impossible to alter; unchangeable: the inalterable routine of a physician.

in·al′ter·a·bil′i·ty n.
in·al′ter·a·bly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Maswood is careful not to put the whole blame on the developed countries for the seeming inalterability of the palpable unequal exchange in trade relations between developed and underdeveloped countries; he points out the culpability of the political elites of the underdeveloped countries in the whole saga as well.
The first step towards transition to the critical mode of perception consists of doubt about the obviousness and inalterability of the concept of the child.
Fingerprints are the oldest and the most reliable features to be used because of their singularity and inalterability.
In the words of Area and Pessoa (2012: 14), to "a flux of production of unstable information and knowledge, in permanent change, in constant transformation, as a counterweight to the cultural production developed--mainly in the 19th and 20th centuries-where stability and inalterability of the physical, material and solid was a priority".
This is evidenced by the related presumption that the Germans assume an "essentialist view of culture," a claim that evokes not only notions of a cultural essence within the German people but also an idea of permanence, motionlessness, and inalterability.
Georgian Foreign Ministry Supports Passing of Law on Inalterability of Country's Course at European Integration