inanition


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in·a·ni·tion

 (ĭn′ə-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. Exhaustion, as from lack of nourishment or vitality.
2. The condition or quality of being empty.

[Middle English inanisioun, emptiness, from Old French inanicion, exhaustion from hunger, from Late Latin inānītiō, inānītiōn-, emptiness, from inānītus, past participle of inānīre, to make empty, from Latin inānis, empty.]

inanition

(ˌɪnəˈnɪʃən)
n
1. (Pathology) exhaustion resulting from lack of food
2. mental, social, or spiritual weakness or lassitude
[C14: from Late Latin inānītio emptiness, from Latin inānis empty; see inane]

in•a•ni•tion

(ˌɪn əˈnɪʃ ən)

n.
1. exhaustion from lack of nourishment.
2. lack of vigor; lethargy.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin inānītiō emptiness]
inanity, inanition - Inanity is intellectual or spiritual emptiness; inanition is the lack of nourishment.
See also related terms for nourishment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inanition - weakness characterized by a lack of vitality or energy
weakness - the property of lacking physical or mental strength; liability to failure under pressure or stress or strain; "his weakness increased as he became older"; "the weakness of the span was overlooked until it collapsed"
2.inanition - exhaustion resulting from lack of food
exhaustion - extreme fatigue
Translations

inanition

[ˌɪnəˈnɪʃən] Ninanición f

inanition

nAuszehrung f

in·a·ni·tion

n. inanición; debilidad; desnutrición.
References in classic literature ?
Thus: If one's duties have kept him in the house all the week, it will rest him to be out on Sunday; if his duties have required him to read weighty and serious matter all the week, it will rest him to read light matter on Sunday; if his occupation has busied him with death and funerals all the week, it will rest him to go to the theater Sunday night and put in two or three hours laughing at a comedy; if he is tired with digging ditches or felling trees all the week, it will rest him to lie quiet in the house on Sunday; if the hand, the arm, the brain, the tongue, or any other member, is fatigued with inanition, it is not to be rested by added a day's inanition; but if a member is fatigued with exertion, inanition is the right rest for it.
I was now nearly sick from inanition, having taken so little the day before.
It may be reasonably inferred that our baby will first expire of inanition, as being the frailest member of our circle; and that our twins will follow next in order.
Upon my recovery, too, I felt very -- oh, inexpressibly sick and weak, as if through long inanition.
Well, who is; but who has good music, and amuses people on Sunday evenings, when the whole of New York is dying of inanition.
My friend had no breakfast himself, for it was one of his peculiarities that in his more intense moments he would permit himself no food, and I have known him presume upon his iron strength until he has fainted from pure inanition.
I kept on with Pope, I kept on with Cervantes, I kept on with Irving, but I suppose there was really not substance enough in Ossian to feed my passion, and it died of inanition.
I fear it even now - I fear any kind friend would tell us we are both deluding ourselves with the idea of keeping up a spiritual intercourse without hope or prospect of anything further - without fostering vain regrets and hurtful aspirations, and feeding thoughts that should be sternly and pitilessly left to perish of inanition.
9) Though Tennyson does not reproduce exactly this account of Elaine's progressive physical debilitation, he does imply that her confinement has been accompanied by marked somatic changes, suggestive of inanition.
In April 1952, the Soviet Union tabled an amendment explicitly stating that the right to work "should be guaranteed by the State, with the object of creating conditions precluding the threat of death from hunger or inanition.
These wretched remnants of what was once a thriving cottage industry set on a country estate, now fallen into ruin, have no idea how to improve their lot, so they drink, whore, and grumble, invariably getting in each other's way in their sodden inanition, until word of a fabled leader's return from the dead inspires in some apprehension, in others hope.
Most friendships die of inanition, caused by circumstances which deprive them of their life blood of communication or by simple neglect, which has the same effect.